BBC Autumnwatch returns to Norfolk for another season

BBC Springwatch presenters Chris Packham and Michaela Strachan at the Wild Ken Hill estate in west Norfolk

BBC presenters Chris Packham and Michaela Strachan at the Wild Ken Hill estate in west Norfolk, when they filmed Springwatch earlier this year. - Credit: Danielle Booden

BBC Autumnwatch is returning to Norfolk again this year to explore what has changed in the county's natural world since spring.

The first episode of the series will see Chris Packham and Michaela Strachan settle into their base in Wild Ken Hill, near Snettisham.

The presenters will highlight the Snettisham Spectacular — an autumn highlight in the bird-watching calendar, where large numbers of knot birds take flight due to the incoming tide at Snettisham beach.

The episode will also head to Northern Ireland where Gillian Burke discovers how moles hide and store worms for the cooler months, while Megan McCubbin is on the Isle of Mull — famous for its eagles, red deer and otters.

The BBC presenters were last in Norfolk for this year's Springwatch, where they presented live for three weeks on the 4,000 acres estate.

An aerial view of Wild Ken Hill, a patchwork of habitats between the main A149 coast road an the sho

An aerial view of Wild Ken Hill, a patchwork of habitats between the main A149 coast road an the shores of the Wash - Credit: Wild Ken Hill

They hoped to catch a glimpse of the beavers which were reintroduced to the Wild Ken Hill site last year, along with songbirds, lapwings and turtle doves as part of a rewilding effort.

More than 1,000 acres of the Wild Ken Hill site were given back to nature in 2020 to boost biodiversity in the area.

Beavers were reintroduced to part of the site to manage woods, native pigs, ponies and cattle graze freely and water levels have been raised to restore wetland habitat.

Ms Strachan said nature is allowed to thrive at the farm, which has been crowned a "fabulous mosaic of habitats", with mammals, waders, birds of prey and farmland birds making up 2,500 species on the site.

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The spring edition of the show also filmed at Pensthorpe Natural Park, near Fakenham, which previously hosted the show between 2008 and 2010.

Presenter Megan McCubbin visited the nature reserve to interview Chrissie Kelley, head of species management, about the corncrakes conservation work the trust had been undertaking.

The first episode of the new autumnal series will air on BBC 2 on October, 26.

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