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See how couple transformed derelict chapel after £200,000 impulse buy

PUBLISHED: 11:22 28 August 2019 | UPDATED: 10:40 29 August 2019

Jack and Alex have revealed their stunning converted Methodist church in Wymondham, Norfolk 
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Jack and Alex have revealed their stunning converted Methodist church in Wymondham, Norfolk Photo: Submit

Archant

A shop worker who fell in love with an old Norfolk chapel and snapped it up within an hour of seeing it for sale has revealed its striking new look.

The Methodist chapel near Wymondham, Norfolk, before the renovation. Pic: Jack KinseyThe Methodist chapel near Wymondham, Norfolk, before the renovation. Pic: Jack Kinsey

Jack Kinsey, 23, bought the Methodist chapel which dates to 1909 in a village near Wymondham in late 2017 with his partner Alex Walters, 29, and they have been renovating it themselves since.

Jack, who is a visual merchandiser for QD stores and Alex, who is a gym manager, both from Norwich, bought the chapel as soon as they saw it advertised for sale.

They are now almost finished having transformed it into a contemporary home with intricate works such as an ornate plasterwork ceiling and a spiral iron staircase created by Alex's father who is a blacksmith.

"I put in an offer within the hour," said Jack. "We were looking for a chapel or a church, or a water tower or even a windmill, something with character. When we saw it, we just wanted to bring it back to life, it was looking a little sorry for itself."

Before: Inside the chapel before the renovation. Pic: Jack KinseyBefore: Inside the chapel before the renovation. Pic: Jack Kinsey

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The Primitive Methodist chapel had been in use until the 1970s after which it was converted to residential use a decade later. It was then made into a home with an open-plan living area, a snug, small studio, mezzanine bedroom and kitchen but was in need of modernisation.

After; the chapel conversion now. Pic: Jack KinseyAfter; the chapel conversion now. Pic: Jack Kinsey

Jack added: "We stripped back the floorboards and put in the plasterwork ceiling with a chandelier, we've added character touches such as columns and double doors."

The home, which is two storeys with two bedrooms, both with modern en suites, sits in a third of an acre giving the couple a decent-sized garden and country views.

"There have been challenges, we've never done anything like this before," Jack said. "The roof was leaking in a handful of places so it had to come off and go back on again but we love it now, we're really proud of what we've achieved."

And even though the project has taken some time and money to complete it has not put the pair off trying again.

After: the chapel conversion now. Pic: Jack KinseyAfter: the chapel conversion now. Pic: Jack Kinsey

"We've got the bug," he said. "We're going to live in it but we'd like to do another project as although it's really hard work, it's really rewarding."

The chapel had the inscription 'Primitive Methodist Church Centenary 1909' on the front and has nine foundation stones dated April 12, 1909. Unlike some churches, chapels do not come with burial grounds making them ideal property conversions.

After: the chapel conversion now. Pic: Jack KinseyAfter: the chapel conversion now. Pic: Jack Kinsey

Before: the chapel before the renovation. Pic: Jack KinseyBefore: the chapel before the renovation. Pic: Jack Kinsey

After: the chapel conversion now. Pic: Jack KinseyAfter: the chapel conversion now. Pic: Jack Kinsey

After: the chapel conversion now. Pic: Jack KinseyAfter: the chapel conversion now. Pic: Jack Kinsey

The Methodist chapel. Pic: Jack KinseyThe Methodist chapel. Pic: Jack Kinsey

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An old photograph of the Methodist chapel. Pic: Jack KinseyAn old photograph of the Methodist chapel. Pic: Jack Kinsey

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