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Popular Skeyton Trosh event cancelled due to growing insurance risk

Scenes from the annual Skeyton Trosh, which is being cancelled after 10 years. Pictures: ALLY McGILVRAY

Scenes from the annual Skeyton Trosh, which is being cancelled after 10 years. Pictures: ALLY McGILVRAY

ALLY McGILVRAY

A popular north Norfolk vintage farming day is being cancelled after 10 years due to organisers' concerns over insurance risks at the growing event.

Graham Kirk, organiser of the annual Skeyton Trosh. Picture: MARK BULLIMOREGraham Kirk, organiser of the annual Skeyton Trosh. Picture: MARK BULLIMORE

The annual Skeyton Michaelmas Trosh, which featured working displays of bygone agricultural machinery in the village near Aylsham, attracted about 50 visitors in its inaugural year – but by its 10th anniversary in 2018 the attendance had risen to an estimated 1,500 people.

Organiser Graham Kirk said, as the event grew, the risk of bringing so many people onto an uneven stubble field every September, while old farming machines were at work, became too great.

He said the decision to stop the Trosh was taken “with a very heavy heart”.

“Last year’s event was the largest both in terms of working displays and attractions together with a larger attendance,” he said. “Whilst this is very pleasing to see, it does bring with it potential problems, especially on a stubble field. It is impossible to insure for every eventuality.

Scenes from the annual Skeyton Trosh, which is being cancelled after 10 years. Picture: Tim KitsonScenes from the annual Skeyton Trosh, which is being cancelled after 10 years. Picture: Tim Kitson

“People who attend ploughing matches are used to walking in a ploughed field, but we are open to everyone and if it is dry you get deep tramlines in the soil, so that is where we have had to be cautious.

“You never know if something might rise from the ashes in a different situation where some of these issues might be resolved, but as far as the Trosh goes at Skeyton, we will call a halt to it while people have got good memories of it. We have had a good run, and some jolly good years.

“We do understand many will be very sad to learn that the Trosh has finished, but we do know the correct decision has been made.”

READ MORE: Watch a soaring bird’s eye view of farming heritage at Skeyton Trosh

Mr Kirk said although the Trosh wasn’t started as a fundraising event, as its growing popularity meant it was able to give “generous support” to local good causes including Skeyton Church and Village Hall, and also for Buxton Sea Scouts.

“The committee would like to say a very big ‘thank you’ to all those who have brought along various machines, tractors, implements and steam engines, together with the many helpers and supporters of the event,” he said. “Also a most sincere appreciation to the many visitors that have attended the event over the years.”

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