Roy Williams, Rackheath

DAVID WAKEFIELD Britain's (Europe's too) finest trombone exponent delighted a packed house at the Green Man with a display of agility that made mockery of the labels that some jazz followers delight on pinning upon musicians.

DAVID WAKEFIELD

Britain's (Europe's too) finest trombone exponent delighted a packed house at the Green Man with a display of agility that made mockery of the labels that some jazz followers delight on pinning upon musicians.

Here is a man who honed his skills in the fine Alex Welsh Bands of the '60s and '70s (labelled Dixieland) but who can play in whatever genre suits the mood.

That curious phrase “a musician's musician” definitely applies here, for Williams' infectious enthusiasm, which matches his technical skills, had the effect of bringing out the best in the house trio (Mike Capocci, piano and vibes, Mike Harris, bass, and Jack Parnell, drums). The trio became a quartet with the addition of the experienced and very listenable Phil Brook on guitar.


You may also want to watch:


Puncuated by those wry announcements that we have to come to love over the years, Williams breezed through a programme of fairly predictable material, standards mostly, but no easy pathway.

At least two are devils to play, and the changes inYou Stepped Out Of A Dream have brought many a budding musician to his knees.

Most Read

No doubt, though, about the evening's highlight – the splendid treatment of the old ballad Polka Dots and Moonbeams by Jimmy Van Heusen (“I'm wearing one of his shirts” muttered Williams). Oh well, the old ones, in every sense, are still the best.

t The night was part of the East Coast Jazz Festival.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus