Review: The Wailers

The Wailers

The Wailers - Credit: Archant

This year has marked what would have been Bob Marley's 70th birthday, and 34 years after the reggae superstar's death his music still has the power to move an audience.

The Wailers

UEA LCR

This year has marked what would have been Bob Marley's 70th birthday, and 34 years after the reggae superstar's death his music still has the power to move an audience.

The Wailers, the original trio made up of Bob, Bunny Wailer and Peter Tosh, but which later transformed into the singer's backing band when the later two left and he became a solo superstar, arrived in Norwich having previously toured the Exodus and Survival albums.

The only original member of the band now is bassist Aston 'Family Man' Barrett, himself celebrating his 68 birthday coincidentally with this gig. Wearing a Rastafarian beanie hat, he nowadays plays seated at the back of the stage, and doesn't reappear for the encore, instead letting a new generation of singers and musicians bring the upbeat hits to life. Singer Dwayne 'Danglin' Anglin has the most daunting task, recreating the late singer's vocal and charisma, but does a creditable job without lapsing into tribute act territory, particularly on a rousing Redemption Song.

This tour sees them celebrating of the Legend, the posthumous greatest hits album, which remains the best-selling reggae album of all-time. It is an album skewed to the sweeter sounds of Satisfy My Soul, Waiting in Vain and Three Little Birds, rather then his more defiant political material. But as a sold out crowd sung every song word perfect no one here was complaining.

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