Thousands enjoy exhibition celebrating Norwich Castle’s history

The model of the Castle and its defences and boundaries as they were in the 12th century, in the Squ

The model of the Castle and its defences and boundaries as they were in the 12th century, in the Square Box on the Hill exhibition of the history of Norwich Castle. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2018

An exhibition celebrating Norwich Castle's 900 years of history has to date attracted 30,000 visitors.

Paris Agar, curator of the Square Box on the Hill exhibition of the history of Norwich Castle, with

Paris Agar, curator of the Square Box on the Hill exhibition of the history of Norwich Castle, with the suit of Japanese samurai armour from the Museum's collection. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2018

The Square Box on the Hill charts the story of the city landmark, from its early days as a medieval royal palace to its time as a prison and now as a museum.

The exhibition looks to the past but also to the future, giving people the chance to find out more about the ambitious £13.5m Norwich Castle: Gateway to Medieval England project which aims to restore the castle keep back to how it was in the days of the Norman kings.

The Square Box on the Hill first opened in February and runs until June 3, and Paris Agar, project curator for Norwich Castle: Gateway to Medieval England, said she was delighted with how the exhibition had captivated the crowds.

'For the first time, the ancient walls of Norwich Castle have been given a voice. People are so enthralled by what they reveal, that they are fast spreading the news,' she said.

Siofra Connor tries out the original revolving doors which were at the visitor's entrance to the Cas

Siofra Connor tries out the original revolving doors which were at the visitor's entrance to the Castle, on display in the Square Box on the Hill exhibition of the history of Norwich Castle. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2018


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'The iconic building's fascinating stories, told in The Square Box on the Hill exhibition, have ignited an exceptional interest in Norwich's much-loved landmark, so much so that 30,000 visitors have flocked to see the displays so far.'

She added: 'It is a personal joy to see gems of the castle's past enjoyed by so many, even the more obscure - the spin of the revolving doors from the old front entrance, the awe of the Japanese samurai suit of armour which used to stand proud in the keep and the surprise that Norwich Castle once had a bitter named its honour, served in the castle's own 1970s licenced bar.'

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She said the exhibition also gave people the chance to get involved with the castle's future.

'The exhibition reflects on the past but also reveals the exciting plans for its future by showing the very latest designs as part of the Norwich Castle: Gateway to Medieval England project, which will see the Castle Keep return to its 12th century opulence.

Paris Agar, curator of the Square Box on the Hill exhibition. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Paris Agar, curator of the Square Box on the Hill exhibition. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2018

'The exhibition gives the opportunity for visitors to give feedback on designs and have a say in the castle's next chapter.'

Running alongside the exhibition is the fifth Norwich Castle Open Art Show which this year has the theme inheritance.

The Square Box on the Hill is at Norwich Castle until June 3 and Inheritance: Norwich Castle Open Art Show runs until May 20. Visit www.museums.norfolk.gov.uk/norwich-castle

Items from the bar which used to be in the Castle, financed by local brewery Watney Mann which launc

Items from the bar which used to be in the Castle, financed by local brewery Watney Mann which launched the Norwich Castle Bitter in 1978, on display in the Square Box on the Hill exhibition of the history of Norwich Castle. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2018

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