George Ezra reveals he wrote part of his new album at a Norfolk pig farm

George Ezra live at Radio 1 Big Weekend in Norwich. Picture Paul Bayfield.

George Ezra live at Radio 1 Big Weekend in Norwich. Picture Paul Bayfield.

George Ezra has revealed how he wrote part of his new album at a farm in Norfolk.

The 24-year-old singer-songwriter said the pig farm in the county was one of the many places he visited for inspiration for his new album Staying At Tamara's.

Other trips the Budapest hit-maker, who played Radio 1's Big Weekend in Norwich, took while writing the album included the Isle of Skye and a converted cow shed in north Wales.

'What often happens with these trips is I never actually write any songs on them but the notepads are filled with what will become the songs once I dig back through them,' he said.

The musician today announced details of his second album with the record exploring themes of escapism in the face of rolling news and 'strange times'.


You may also want to watch:


Ahead of the album's release in March, Ezra unveiled new single Paradise which is dedicated to his girlfriend and focuses on his emotions during the early days of their relationship.

He said he was 'very much in a relationship', adding of the track: 'Instead of a particular story it's more of a feeling that takes over when you've fallen in love which is just quite heady, isn't it.'

Most Read

The album follows a sense of 'daydreaming and escapism', Ezra said, which was motivated by him receiving an overwhelming number of 'breaking news alerts' on his phone.

'I'd hear about something going on in rural Germany and now whilst that it is important and something bad might be happening in somewhere I am not necessarily living, I don't need to know about it before it's really happened.

'These news alerts are a headline before anyone knows who, what, where or why.'

The Hertford-born singer said he felt no pressure in following up to 2014's number one record Wanted On Voyage which was in the charts for a total of 122 weeks.

He added: 'The most important part for me is that I can tour...that's the bit I love and I love the record and I just hope it's given a fair shot and people enjoy it.'

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter