Disabled Happisburgh artist’s work on show at London’s Selfridges

A prolific, disabled artist from north Norfolk is having some of his work on show in a ground-breaking exhibition at a famous London venue – 12 years after his death.

Works by Roy Collinson are on show this month at Selfridges in Oxford Street as part of Britain's first international survey of contemporary studios for artists with disabilities.

Roy moved from London to The Rookery home for adults with learning difficulties in Walcott in 1981.

When the neighbouring Barrington Farm Arts Barn Studio opened in 1987, Roy attended there daily to work on his art.

By the time he died, aged 53, in 1999, he had produced hundreds of works – many of them on popular cultural themes such as aliens, cowboys and warriors.


You may also want to watch:


Roy's work has been shown locally and nationally in the past and last year Sarah Ballard, curator of the Barrington Farm art archive (RoaR), successfully put forward some of his paintings for a Museum of Everything exhibition by disabled people in the Turbine Hall at London's Tate Modern museum.

This led to the Tate buying some of them for their permanent exhibition.

Most Read

These works are now on show in the Museum of Everything Exhibition #4 in Selfridges in London's Oxford Street which runs until October 25.

Ms Ballard said: 'We are incredibly happy that Roy's work is achieving the recognition it deserves through this exhibition

'It is great that people from all over the world can finally see these amazing images that have remained hidden for so long.'

The Wonder Room at Selfridges is also offering for sale clothing and other goods with designs inspired by works in the exhibition.

Visit www.barringtonfarm.com and www.museumofeverything.com

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus