Daniel Evans

CHRISTOPHER SMITH Similar in size to the salons of the Viennese palaces where so much classical music was first heard, the Georgian Music Room at the Assembly House is just the right venue for the festival's lunchtime recitals.

CHRISTOPHER SMITH

Similar in size to the salons of the Viennese palaces where so much classical music was first heard, the Georgian Music Room at the Assembly House is just the right venue for the festival's lunchtime recitals. The first of them attracted a large audience that enjoyed the performance by Daniel Evans. This young pianist from Wymondham will clearly be going a long way.

Nimble fingers gave life to an opening Scarlatti group. Then it was time for more solid fare. Evans entered into a world of genuine emotions in Beethoven's Opus 81a sonata. First came sorrow at parting from a friend at difficult times, then the unbridled delight of reunion as the clouds lifted.

There was particular artistry in the handling of a recurring falling figure. It never seemed to be a mere repetition, but instead conveyed a sense of longing that grew deeper as time passed. The chief melodies became songs about words, and the final movement sped along in sheer exhilaration.

Cascades of notes were the feature of two Studies by Liszt. In his Second Hungarian Rhapsody, virtuosity was put to better use, not to invite admiration but to stir hearts. Rhythmically strong, the music had a truculent swagger as it challenged the cultural values of Austrian aristocratic circles.

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