Win double a family affair

A mother and daughter clinched the double in the sunshine at Aylsham Show for a husband and wife team.Jane and George Bell, of Erpingham, near Aylsham, were delighted when their veteran mare, Westwood Honey, took the supreme championship beating her own daughter, Legal Titbit, into the reserve title in the ridden hunter class.

A mother and daughter clinched the double in the sunshine at Aylsham Show for a husband and wife team.

Jane and George Bell, of Erpingham, near Aylsham, were delighted when their veteran mare, Westwood Honey, took the supreme championship beating her own daughter, Legal Titbit, into the reserve title in the ridden hunter class.

Mrs Bell, who bought the mare as a three-year-old to hunt with the North Norfolk Harriers, has been showing the 21-year-old mare for some years. "We've come close on several occasions but this year we've finally got the supreme trophy," she added.

They did consider entering a veteran class but the mare really enjoys her only show outing to Aylsham, said Mrs Bell, who hunted her every season until she was retired at the age of 16. "And since then, she has produced some really good foals," she added.


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The reserve champion, three-year-old Legal Titbit, also beat another half-sister, Robbit, to ensure that the Bell's entries won a string of trophies.

Mrs Bell, who bought Westwood Honey as a three-year-old from Norfolk farmer Andy Boesen, said that the mare has never won the top title at Aylsham although she has been reserve champion. "It was tremendous to have her win but I think that she will probably be retired now. Aylsham is the only show where we take her," she added.

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Her groom, Alison Debbage, who has been with her for 20 years, was also part of the successful show team.

Honey was a good companion and did first class duty when Mrs Bell was field master with the North Norfolk Harriers. And maintaining the connection, another of her foals, Gromit, does similar duty for Emily Bambridge, of Blickling, who is also field master with the harriers.

The Aylsham show jumping was a huge success, writes Hayley Gibbs.

Both rings were well attended, in particular the senior ring, which drew more competitors back this year and, with the good ground, produced some superb jumping.

In ring one, Caroline Casburn was extremely pleased with her young horse Herbie Goes Green, taking the honours in the British Novice. Emily Clifton rode an extremely good round, winning the Discovery. Sue Vincent, on Ranchwood Banana Split, won the 1.05m with seconds to spare from her nearest rival; Anna Strawson, on Mytice Minding Time, took the 1.10m and Lorna Crook, on Creevagh High Flyer, was over the moon with her win in the Foxhunter/1.20m with the horse only just coming back to work after an injury.

Ring two saw some extremely good classes too. Hanna Vincent, on Pogo Pumpkin, took the British Novice; Ruby Pointer had a superb day winning the Junior Discovery/.90m Open and finishing first and second on Brockman Madison and Pretty Mate in the Blue Chip Newcomer/1m Open.

Unfortunately, the Junior Foxhunter was cancelled through lack of entries. The .70m Ponies saw Charlotte Peasley, on Bureside Drifter, win. Oliver Rose-Eyre, on C B Sam, took first place in the .80m and Claudia Cameron, on Oberon, won second in the .80m and first in the .90m.

In the horse classes, Scott Adcock on Alto Heather Z won the .70m, Laura Howlett took the .80m, on Prince of Overa, and Zoe Roper-Smith, having been placed second in the .80m, won the .90m on Polly Pocket.

In the showing, it was the Hirst sisters who enjoyed a good day. Fiona won the novice hunter and championship on Carry on Cavalier, a new horse who arrived from Ireland only last week. Fiona also won the open working hunter on Lord Leonardo and stood reserve to her younger sister Eleanor, who won the mountain and moorland A and B ridden class and the Colne working hunter on Northlight Solero and then went on to win the working hunter championship.

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