Tragedy at Snetterton weekend

An excellent weekend of racing at Snetterton was overshadowed by the death of Stephen Jewell during practice for Sunday's Vintage Sports Car Club meeting.

While being overtaken by another competitor along the Senna Straight Jewell lost control of his Bugatti T35B, after contact between the pair, and struck the safety barrier.

The 63-year-old from Cheltenham was thrown out of the cockpit and succumbed to his injuries on the way to hospital.

Activities resumed after a near three hour delay with David Morris securing his ninth Seaman Trophy in his ERA R11B, affectionately known as Humphrey, the winning car at Snetterton's first ever meeting in 1951. However the outright winner of the event, to take the Flockhart Trophy home again, was Philip Walker in his Lotus while the awesome Kurtis Indy Roadster of Frederick Harper was adjudged to have beaten Morris to the finishing line in what looked like a dead-heat.

Morris was unable to challenge for the Bruce Spollon Trophy despite leading away from the grid when fuel problems stopped 'Humphrey', allowing Calum Lockie to seal victory in Sean Denaher's Maserati 6CM.


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A wonderful close F3 500 race was won by Simon Front in the final few yards from Roy Hunt and George Shackleton while Ewen Getley took home the Donington Mug with his first ever victory.

North Walsham's James Paterson finished third in the 50's Sports Car event behind Downham Market's Steven Hunt, which was his second trip to the podium having been placed second during a similar event the previous day, beating his local rival in the process.

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Roger Bennington of Long Stratton Motor Company could celebrate his driver Andrew Jarman winning the Aston Martin GT4 Challenge with victory on the team's home circuit.

East Coast resident John Burton endured a difficult day. Having crashed in qualifying his team pulled his Jaguar XK120 back into shape, only for the bottom radiator hose to pull off causing the local race to spin and relinquish his hard fought class lead.

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