A moment in history for City – even though it was by no means a classic

Norwich City celebrate after winning the Milk Cup final. Photo: Archant Library

Norwich City celebrate after winning the Milk Cup final. Photo: Archant Library - Credit: Archant

Memorable games don't necessarily have to be classics – and City's Milk Cup final encounter with Sunderland in 1985 was certainly a case in point.

Mick Channon enjoys the moment at Wembley. Photo: Archant Library.

Mick Channon enjoys the moment at Wembley. Photo: Archant Library. - Credit: Archant

In terms of entertainment value the game wasn't a whole lot better than the Canaries' two previous visits to Wembley in the same competition during the 1970s.

But this time it was a 1-0 win rather than a 1-0 defeat and it doesn't get much better for any fan than seeing your side triumph at the home of English football. For the Norwich supporters in the 100,000 crowd it was the result that mattered, not how it was acheived.

That said there was no doubt that the better side on the day came out on top, with Ken Brown's team playing the neater football and also carving out more scoring opportunities, even though they needed a missed penalty to help them along the way.

After a goalless first half the match burst into life in the opening minute of the second period when the Canaries scored what proved to be the decisive goal. John Deehan was a great goalscorer for City, with 70 to his name in 199 appearances, but on a memorable March afternoon he was the architect of one of the most famous – and most debated – goals in the club's history.

Celebration time at Wembley. Picture: Archant Library

Celebration time at Wembley. Picture: Archant Library - Credit: Archant

The striker spotted young defender David Corner trying to shepherd the ball out near the corner flag and dispossessed him before somehow keeping it in play and cutting it back to the supporting Asa Hartford.

Seconds later the ball was in the back of the Sunderland net, with the midfielder's shot taking a wicked deflection off Gordon Chisholm to wrong-foot keeper Chris Turner.

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Depending on where you look now it was either a dream goal for a sprightly veteran or an own goal – but all that mattered at the time was that City were ahead.

They had one big scare after that, with Dennis Van Wyk carelessly handling a loose ball in the box, but the Dutch defender's blushes were spared when Clive Walker missed the target from the spot.

The Canaries then comfortably saw out the game to seal what remains their only major cup triumph – but there was a double sting in the tail a few months later when City were relegated from the top flight, before the ramifications of the Heysel tragedy robbed them of their rightful place in Europe.