Norwich roadworks delayed - by a parked car

A Porsche Cayenne parked on Finkelgate has forced Transport for Norwich to paint double yellow lines

A Porsche Cayenne parked on Finkelgate has forced Transport for Norwich to paint double yellow lines on along the road on either side of the car. - Credit: Archant

Parking in Norwich for free can be a notoriously difficult task.

A Porsche Cayenne parked on Finkelgate has forced Transport for Norwich to paint double yellow lines

A Porsche Cayenne parked on Finkelgate has forced Transport for Norwich to paint double yellow lines on along the road on either side of the car. - Credit: Archant

But the driver of this Porsche Cayenne seems to have a novel solution to the problem - park the car before the council paint double yellow lines.

The car has been parked on Finkelgate for at least two weeks despite calls from city transport officials to remove it.

Transport for Norwich wants the vehicle removed as it continues work to install parking restrictions on the road.

That includes painting double yellow lines - with the abandoned Porsche providing a troublesome obstacle.


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Its presence has meant that council road workers have been forced to paint lines on either side of the vehicle.

The new parking restrictions are part of a project to improve the exit from Ber Street.

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Transport for Norwich said they spoke to the owner about moving the car on October 5.

A spokesperson for Transport for Norwich said: 'Enforcement officers from Norwich City Council have already been in touch with the owner of the car asking for its removal.

'On the grounds that fair warning has been given and the meaning of the new road markings is clear, formal enforcement action is being taken as a last resort.

'In the first instance, PCNs will be issued on a daily basis until the car is removed from site.

'Since it's important that Finkelgate is clear in time for completion of the traffic scheme, other enforcement powers are also being explored in case they are needed.'

It's not the first time double yellow lines in the city have made headlines.

In December 2011 the council painted a set of lines on Stafford Street measuring only 17 inches.

The lines caused many to wonder if they were, in fact, Britain's shortest set of double yellow lines.

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