Yarmouth’s starring role in new film

Picture: O J Spalding

Picture: O J Spalding - Credit: O J Spalding

A Norwich film-maker with roots in Yarmouth returned to the seaside town, to shoot the story of a single mum who finds she is pregnant again.

Picture: O J Spalding

Picture: O J Spalding - Credit: O J Spalding

Director Oliver Spalding – known as OJ Spalding – lives in Norwich but went to university at Kingston in south-west London before graduating with a film studies degree in 2014.

Mr Spalding, 23, said: 'I was a little disappointed by the content of this course, though, and after it finished, all I wanted to do was dedicate my time to writing and directing a short film of my own.

'I wanted to make a very British film. In this sense, I also wanted to set the film in a place I was familiar with and that felt uniquely British.

'My mother's side of my family live in Great Yarmouth and I'd spent a lot of my childhood in the town so it felt like a good choice, especially since I'd never seen a film set there.'

Picture: O J Spalding

Picture: O J Spalding - Credit: O J Spalding


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The film, Positive, features land-marks and the Pleasure Beach can be easily picked out in some of the scenes.

Mr Spalding said: 'Positive tells the story of Gemma, a single mother of two young boys, who finds out that she's pregnant again.

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'After failing to get in touch with the person she knows to be the father over the phone, she decides to go to his local pub instead, leaving the boys at a nearby amusement arcade in the meantime.'

And as well as featuring some well-known locations, viewers will see some familiar faces in the cast too. Jamie Coleman and Solomon Reid – who play Gemma's sons – were cast from Stage Door Youth Theatre, Gorleston.

The production team are also local, with cameramen Stu McComie and Moyses Gomes coming from Norwich, and editor Michal Zak.

Mr Zak, 22, said: 'It's been a massive learning experience because of the sheer scale of the project and the fact that Oliver approached it really seriously.

'I felt the pressure to make sure the editing quality matched the quality of the cinematography, performances and story.

'It was a really long and complicated process but the most rewarding thing was knowing that with every cut the film kept getting better.'

Now, Mr Spalding is waiting for the final soundtrack to be composed by Royal College of Music student Sergei Istrati, before releasing the film and submitting it to film festivals.

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