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Work on new £1m park ‘paused’ amid pandemic

PUBLISHED: 12:39 01 April 2020 | UPDATED: 13:19 01 April 2020

Construction on the new park and gateway at Ness Point in Lowestoft has been paused amid the continuing coronavirus crisis. One of the last deliveries made to the site was of several Swedish Whitebeam and Lobel Elm trees, some of which have been installed. Pictures: East Suffolk Council Facebook

Construction on the new park and gateway at Ness Point in Lowestoft has been paused amid the continuing coronavirus crisis. One of the last deliveries made to the site was of several Swedish Whitebeam and Lobel Elm trees, some of which have been installed. Pictures: East Suffolk Council Facebook

Archant

Work to transform Britain’s most easterly point is on hold after construction was paused.

The plans to turn Ness Point in Lowestoft into a landmark destination has seen major works to develop the most easterly park in the UK under way over the past couple of months.

But last week construction on the new park and gateway that celebrates Lowestoft’s “unique maritime heritage” and “relationship to the sea” was paused amid the continuing coronavirus crisis.

Construction on the new park and gateway at Ness Point in Lowestoft has been paused amid the continuing coronavirus crisis. One of the last deliveries made to the site was of several Swedish Whitebeam and Lobel Elm trees, some of which have been installed. Pictures: East Suffolk Council FacebookConstruction on the new park and gateway at Ness Point in Lowestoft has been paused amid the continuing coronavirus crisis. One of the last deliveries made to the site was of several Swedish Whitebeam and Lobel Elm trees, some of which have been installed. Pictures: East Suffolk Council Facebook

The Ness – the UK’s most easterly park – will be regenerated after £1m was secured from the Coastal Community Fund in 2017.

The Ness is being delivered by a partnership of Lowestoft Town Council, East Suffolk Council and Concertus Design and Property Consultants along with Blakedown Landscapes and Allen Scott Landscape Architecture.

An East Suffolk Council spokesman said: “Construction on The Ness has been paused as a result of the Covid-19 outbreak.

“Although the contractor has been proactive in following the social distancing guidance, there has been difficulty with getting deliveries needed for the works to continue.

Construction on the new park and gateway at Ness Point in Lowestoft has been paused amid the continuing coronavirus crisis. One of the last deliveries made to the site was of several Swedish Whitebeam and Lobel Elm trees, some of which have been installed. Pictures: East Suffolk Council FacebookConstruction on the new park and gateway at Ness Point in Lowestoft has been paused amid the continuing coronavirus crisis. One of the last deliveries made to the site was of several Swedish Whitebeam and Lobel Elm trees, some of which have been installed. Pictures: East Suffolk Council Facebook

“Everyone involved in the project is endeavouring to prevent further delays by continuing to work behind the scenes, and work will resume on site as soon as it safe to do so.

“One of the last deliveries made to the site was of several Swedish Whitebeam and Lobel Elm trees, which have been chosen specifically to suit the harsh coastal environment of this site.

“The trees were planted early last week in self watering bags, and will be checked regularly to ensure that they take well.

“Whilst the delays are disappointing, we look forward to the opening of the UK’s most easterly park later in the year.”

A picnic area, performance space, timber trail and play equipment – including a fun Pile Driver slide, scramble nets, swings and monkey bars – will all feature as the history of the Denes is celebrated.

The Ness also aims to secure the future of the net drying racks, which were once used by the fishing industry in the heyday of the herring trade,

It will improve access, knowledge, participation and enjoyment of North Lowestoft and its unique maritime heritage, with the park naturally landscaped to maintain its heritage features with cycling and pedestrian access to the sea wall and the coastal path.


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