Flood alerts along the Norfolk coast are lifted after evening high tides pass off quietly

Spring High Tide at Blakeney Quay which flooded the car park surrounding several cars and The Quay r

Spring High Tide at Blakeney Quay which flooded the car park surrounding several cars and The Quay road.Picture: MARK BULLIMORE

Coastal communities on the north Norfolk coast have breathed a sigh of relief after higher than normal tides passed with no major incidents.

Wells Quay at high tide this morning. Picture: Robert Smith

Wells Quay at high tide this morning. Picture: Robert Smith - Credit: Archant

The Environment Agency issued flood alerts – the lowest of its three warning levels – for the area between Old Hunstanton and Cley and Hunstanton and King's Lynn.

The agency said unusually high water in the morning and evening was due to astronomical tides with a surge height of 0.7 metres.

There were also concerns about the strength of the winds.

Graham Lubbock, senior flood warden for Blakeney, said the quay had flooded the same amount last night as it had yesterday morning but no properties and businesses were affected.

Spring High Tide at Blakeney Quay which flooded the car park surrounding several cars and The Quay r

Spring High Tide at Blakeney Quay which flooded the car park surrounding several cars and The Quay road.Picture: MARK BULLIMORE


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He said the situation last night was not critical and he thought it was going to be worse than it was.

Mr Lubbock added it was common for the harbour to flood when tides were higher than nine metres.

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Water lapped the bottom of the Blakeney Hotel and around cars parked on the quay yesterday morning.

A few interested dog walkers and onlookers, as well as visitors and locals, were taking pictures of the scene.

Morston Quay at high tide on Saturday morning. Picture: Beans Boat Trips

Morston Quay at high tide on Saturday morning. Picture: Beans Boat Trips - Credit: Archant

Marek Pawlowski, 33, who lives just off Blakeney Quay, said: 'Aside from the summer, this is one of the biggest tides we have seen. It usually happens once a year when the water gets up to the wall of the Blakeney Hotel and covers the quay. People always come out for the spectacle. For people who live here, high tides are a fairly regular site. I cannot imagine people who live here would be too worried.'

The consultant, who has lived in Blakeney for three years, said big tides normally happened every spring and autumn and people would kayak or use rowing boats along the quay when it flooded.

He added the water possibly only reached the cars on Blakeney Quay car park this morning because of the strong north-easterly wind.

'Once every three-six months you here a car alarm go off and everyone comes out to look at the poor car which got stuck in the water,' he added.

Wells harbour master Robert Smith said earlier on Saturday: 'We have had no problems so far this morning and fingers crossed for this evening. We need the winds to ease before the high tide.'

Beans Boat Trips have cancelled the 4.45pm seal trip at Morston on Saturday due to strong winds and high tides.

People are being advised to phone Beans for information on Sunday trips.

Beans tweeted: 'Big tide at Morston Quay this weekend. Big all weekend so take care where you park and walking on the beaches.'

Meanwhile, North Sea water surrounded parked cars on Blakeney Quay this morning at the height of the high tide.

The A149 coast road was not affected by the tide and a member of the staff from the Norfolk Wildlife Trust Cley Visitors Centre, between Cley and Salthouse, said the salt marshes had not been flooded.

He described the sea as 'choppy'.

The 'exceptionally high' tide was also visible at Denver Sluice.

Phil Bancroft, of Denver Sailing Club, said: 'Members were starting a West Norfolk Rowing Club training session and we looked over the old sluice to see the exceptionally high tide. The level was only a couple of inches off the level on December 5, 2013.'

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