Villagers fear development may harm New Buckenham’s heritage

Plans have been put forward for fields off Cuffer Lane, near Moat Lane and Saint Martins Gardens in

Plans have been put forward for fields off Cuffer Lane, near Moat Lane and Saint Martins Gardens in New Buckenham for housing. - Credit: Eastern Daily Press © 2016

The character of a Norfolk village, which is an early example of a medieval planned town, could be under threat if a new housing estate is built, according to residents.

Picture of autumn at New Buckenham Castle. Nikon D2X with 50mm lens 1/1000 sec at F/4. Photo: Angela

Picture of autumn at New Buckenham Castle. Nikon D2X with 50mm lens 1/1000 sec at F/4. Photo: Angela Sharpe Copy: For: EDP EDP pics © 2006 (01603) 772434 - Credit: Archant © 2006

An application to build 16 houses in New Buckenham, near Attle-borough, has been submitted, but the community fears the development could have a detrimental effect on the village's ancient lay-out.

William d'Albini founded the castle in 1145 and the village was built up around it to provide services and labour.

The houses, including five affordable homes and a small public car park, are proposed for land to the south-west of Cuffer Lane.

But this would be outside the village's medieval boundary – which has not changed since the town was constructed.


You may also want to watch:


The application has received more than 30 letters of objection.

Jonathan Hartley, who lives in the village, said: 'There is a genuine concern that if this development is allowed to go ahead the village's medieval character will be lost to history.

Most Read

'Once it's gone there's no turning back.'

Historic England stated in a letter to applicant Charles Stimpson's agent that building on the proposed site has 'the potential to impact upon the setting' of designated heritage assets including the Grade I listed castle, moat, keep and the church of St Martin.

In a bid to halt the development, flyers have been circulated around the village and other concerns raised include an increase in traffic.

Mr Hartley added: 'There is also a real fear that if this first housing estate is allowed to go ahead outside the village boundary it will be the thin end of the wedge which will see a sprawl of development. Everyone is hoping that a bit of common sense will prevail.'

In a document submitted on behalf of Mr Stimpson it stated the development 'ensures minimum impact on historic assets and the landscape'.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter