Village sign's Royal seal of approval

The Duke of Edinburgh unveiled a new village sign at a Norfolk village - just as he and the Queen had done almost 50 years before. In 1957, the then Norfolk Boy Scouts' Association, had presented a gift to the Queen of a carved and painted village sign for Anmer, which is on the Sandringham Estate, to commemorate the first 50 years of scouting.

The Duke of Edinburgh unveiled a new village sign at a Norfolk village - just as he and the Queen had done almost 50 years before.

In 1957, the then Norfolk Boy Scouts' Association, had presented a gift to the Queen of a carved and painted village sign for Anmer, which is on the Sandringham Estate, to commemorate the first 50 years of scouting.

And for the 100th anniversary of the Norfolk Scouts, it was decided that a good way to mark the celebrations, would be to present the village with a new sign, as the old one became worn and weathered.

The original Anmer village sign was made in oak by the late Harry Carter of Swaffham, and the new sign has been closely modelled on this and made from oak supplied by the royal estate.

The new sign took more than a month to create and was carved by Norfolk Scout Fellowship Commissioner David Andrews 67, from King's Lynn.

Mr Andrews tried to keep the new sign as close to the original as possible and carried out his work at the Sandringham Estate workshops.

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The new sign has on one side the figure of a Norfolk Boy Scout, while on the other is a Roman warrior.

The Duke of Edinburgh, unveiled the sign, before spending time chatting to villagers, dignitaries and scouts, who had attended the informal ceremony.

Richard Butler, County Commissioner for the Norfolk Scouts, said: “We are absolutely delighted that the Duke took the time to unveil the sign. The Norfolk Scouts are also indebted to the hours of workmanship put in by David Andrews to create the sign.”