Treasure inquests opened into five objects unearthed in Norfolk

Early-medieval gilded silver and enamelled disc brooch found in Norfolk.

Early-medieval gilded silver and enamelled disc brooch found in Norfolk. - Credit: Norfolk Coroners Court

Historic items unearthed by metal detectorists in Norfolk that are potentially of national importance are the subject of treasure inquests.

The objects include a post-medieval hawking ring, an early-medieval silver ring, an early-medieval gilded brooch and a medieval pilgrim badge.

Medieval gilded silver pilgrim badge and early-medieval silver hooked tag found in Norfolk.

Medieval gilded silver pilgrim badge and early-medieval silver hooked tag found in Norfolk. - Credit: Norfolk Coroners Court

The finds were made between August 10 and September 17 last year in Swannington, at Roudham and Larling, near Great Massingham, and in the parish of Swarston. 

One was also found close to Ryston, near Downham Market, in January this year.

Inquests have been opened and adjourned by assistant coroner Catherine Wood with full hearings, where they could be declared as treasure, to take place on May 5.

Early-medieval silver finger ring and post-medieval silver vervel found in Norfolk.

Early-medieval silver finger ring and post-medieval silver vervel found in Norfolk. - Credit: Norfolk Coroners Court

Finds believed to be treasure must be reported to the coroner within 14 days, with finders, including metal detectorists, asked to take it to a local museum or archaeological body.

If believed to be of significance, a treasure inquest is held to determine whether an item constitutes treasure, with the British Museum then deciding whether they or any other museum wish to acquire it.