Jaguar X-type true Brit

Iain Dooley says Jaguar's X-Type saloon offers buyers seeking a stylish compact executive motor a genuine rival to the German competition.Engines - Jaguar offers a modest range of engines for its X-Type, although what's on offer is admittedly good.

Iain Dooley says Jaguar's X-Type saloon offers buyers seeking a stylish compact executive motor a genuine rival to the German competition.

Engines - Jaguar offers a modest range of engines for its X-Type, although what's on offer is admittedly good. As you would expect there are some smooth V6 petrol units to chose from, plus the expected diesel alternatives. Many ex-fleet cars will come with the latter, which will make more financial sense if you plan on racking up the miles.


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Exterior - If you're a Jaguar fan you'll no doubt quickly warm to the car. Radical it is not, but the X-Type is most definitely a Jaguar and one that has remained a distinctive sight on the roads long after its launch.

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Interior - Like the exterior, the

X-Type's cabin is a smaller, more condensed version of your average old-school Jaguar. It feels snug inside, while the ambience is up there with something costing 10 times as much if you choose a car with leather upholstery.

Driving - The 'baby' Jaguar's compact size means it can be driven briskly on your favourite country road with confidence. It shares a few things with Ford's Mondeo of the same era, which means ride and handling are pretty good. The petrol engines are willing performers, and the diesel units aren't far behind. And remember, the 2.5 and 3.0-litre V6 petrol cars come with four-wheel drive for added security in poor weather.

Ownership - The X-Type is not the disappointment some sections of the motoring media would like you to believe. It has all the visual hallmarks of a Jaguar, it drives well - all engines offer impressive levels of performance - and in saloon form the car is surprisingly practical.

What to look for - The car's stylish alloys are easily kerbed, so walk away if your potential purchase looks ropey. The same goes for parking dents - don't accept any blemish on a car this new. Be observant on the test-drive, thoroughly inspect the paperwork and you should turn up a decent car for decent money with the minimum of fuss.

Model history - 2001, Jaguar launches its X-Type compact executive model initially with 2.5 and 3.0 V6 petrol variants offered with all-wheel drive; 2002 saw the arrival of front-drive 2.1-litre petrol unit; 2004, Jaguar introduced diesel variants plus an estate version; 2008 saw thoroughly revised X-Type, with revisions to exterior styling, equipment levels and updates to the engine line-up.

Reasons to buy - Looks, Jaguar brand, frugal diesels, smooth V6 petrol motors, generous levels of standard kit, enjoyable to drive.

Reasons to beware - Cabin feels snug, diesels lose all-wheel drive option.

Pick of the range - 2.5 V6 SE auto and 2.2d Sovereign auto.

What to pay - 2.5 V6 SE auto: 2006 06 �9,760; 2006 56 �10,040; 2007 07 �11,175; 2007 57 �11,610; 2008 08 �13,300. 2.2d Sovereign auto: 2008 08 �13,300; 2008 58 �17,965; 2009 09 �21,605; 2009 59 �22,800. Figures relate to showroom prices for cars in A1 condition.

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