Top role in the Met for Norfolk officer

LORNA MARSH A Norfolk officer has been promoted to one of the most senior posts in the Metropolitan police - Britain's biggest force. Chief Supt Ian Quinton was among 10 people bidding for promotion to the rank of commander and one of only three to be promoted.

LORNA MARSH

A Norfolk officer has been promoted to one of the most senior posts in the Metropolitan police - Britain's biggest force.

Chief Supt Ian Quinton was among 10 people bidding for promotion to the rank of commander and one of only three to be promoted.

It is the fourth highest rank in the Met and equivalent to assistant chief constables in other forces.

He was chosen by a panel of four Metropolitan Police Authority (MPA) members advised by the Commissioner Sir Ian Blair who controversially rejected outspoken Scotland Yard Chief Supt Ali Dizaei.

MPA Chair Len Duvall, who led the promotion panel, said: “As we expected all candidates were of a high calibre, which made our final decisions all the more difficult.

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“But we believe we have chosen the best people to join the highest echelons of the police service, and we will expect them to use their skills, expertise and professionalism to deliver for the people of London.

“In their new roles, to be announced by the Commissioner in due course, they will join other senior colleagues in delivering a service that is fit for the 21st century, people-focused and one which values and takes account of what Londoners want from their police. “

Commissioner Sir Ian Blair said: “The position of commander within the Met is tough and demanding and requires real dedication and commitment.”

Chief Supt Quinton, who will start on a salary of £81,953, rising to a maximum of £95,614, is currently seconded to the Home Office as staff officer to Sir Ronnie Flanagan, Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Constabulary.

The 44-year-old, who still lives just outside Norwich with his wife, joined the Metropolitan Police Service in 1982, before transferring to Norfolk Constabulary in 2000.

He was posted to Norwich, where he was responsible for operations including the policing of Norwich home matches.

Ian McPherson, Chief Constable of Norfolk police, said: “We are extremely pleased to hear of Ian Quinton's appointment to the role of commander with the Metropolitan Police and we wish him all the very best in the future with his new role. His promotion is thoroughly deserved and we'd like to take this opportunity to thank him for all of his hard work while he was with Norfolk Constabulary.”