Take a look at what remains of the Little Plumstead Hospital

Little Plumstead Hospital. Photo: Billy Smith

Little Plumstead Hospital. Photo: Billy Smith - Credit: Archant

Browse our reader's photo gallery to discover what the former hospital, which was once an impressive 18th century estate, looks like today.

Norfolk is home to an array of imposing architectural structures and one such building that has always been a unique sight to behold is the Little Plumstead Hospital, which was housed within an 18th century estate.

The hospital, which was initially set up as a mental deficiency colony in 1929, closed in the 1990s and most of the buildings have since been demolished to make way for new homes. However parts of the original hospital still remain, including the Old Hall.

Billy Smith, a 33-year-old construction worker from Cromer, became interested in the building after researching its history and visited the site earlier in the year to collect several eerie images of the remains. His photos reveal the current state of the building, which has boarded up windows, a pile of tyres outside, overgrown plants covering parts of the walls, and signs warning of the dangers inside.

Speaking of his visit, Mr Smith said: 'I made my way around the outside of the building taking pictures. It felt creepy, like I was not alone, almost as if someone was watching me. Despite the damage to the building, it was still possible to appreciate the architecture, it's just such a shame the building was abandoned and left to get into such a state.'


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• The Little Plumstead Hospital site is privately owned and trespassing is not only a criminal offence, but is also incredibly dangerous.

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