Student's plea over football and climate

It is no secret that football fans often travel the length and breadth of the country in support of their beloved team.But a Norfolk teenager has discovered that in Norwich City's case, they actually travel the equivalent of 13 times around the world - and that's just to one match at Carrow Road.

It is no secret that football fans often travel the length and breadth of the country in support of their beloved team.

But a Norfolk teenager has discovered that in Norwich City's case, they actually travel the equivalent of 13 times around the world - and that's just to one match at Carrow Road.

James Mudie , 17, spent four weeks of his summer holiday at UEA analysing facts and figures from the club in relation to its emissions of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide.

As part of a prestigious Nuffield Scholarship - which gives high flying students an early opportunity to take part in scientific research - James has compiled a report in a bid to encourage more fans to take the bus to home matches.


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“Last season Norwich City Football Club had an average attendance of 24,589 and an average home fan attendance of 23,400. This season there has been 16,066 adult season tickets sold. Of these season ticket holders 13,835 live within 35 miles of the club but there are season ticket holders who live all over the country and travel to watch the Canaries play every home game. And how do they get there? By car.”

The club recently launched a Yellow and Greener campaign aimed at cutting emissions at the club, including teaming up with six local coach companies to offer travel to Carrow Road from more than 100 destinations in Norfolk and North Suffolk on match days.

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James, who attends Wymondham College, added: “I would like Norwich City fans to really think about how they travel to games and to make them realise the impact of what they are doing. The big figure of cutting carbon at the club by 60pc is going to take commitment from fans who need to take responsibility for their share.”

James, who hopes to study maths at university, was one of the youngsters who gave a report on their work at UEA yesterday to mark the end of their four week scholarship.

Other students worked on projects at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital and the natural history department at Norwich Museum, including cataloguing and analysing the city's bird nest collection.

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