“She is so brave to be up and doing things again” - Little Overstrand girl Carmel Lucas, 4, is fighting cancer and making loom-band bracelets to sell

Carmel Lucas, 4, who has leukaemia and is now making and selling loom band bracelets to raise money

Carmel Lucas, 4, who has leukaemia and is now making and selling loom band bracelets to raise money for a leukaemia charity. Picture: ANTONY KELLY - Credit: Archant

Little Carmel Lucas, who has leukaemia, should have started school this year but, instead of being beaten by her cancer, she has decided to help others with the disease.

Carmel Lucas, 4, who has leukaemia and is now making and selling loom band bracelets to raise money

Carmel Lucas, 4, who has leukaemia and is now making and selling loom band bracelets to raise money for a leukaemia charity. Pictured with her parents Conan Lucas and Natalie Doughty and brothers Hunter and Roman and sister Luna. Picture: ANTONY KELLY - Credit: Archant

The four-year-old girl from Overstrand has been making loom-band bracelets to raise money for Children With Cancer UK, selling them to friends and family.

And with hopes of one day becoming a prima ballerina, Carmel has decided she wants to travel to London to see a performance of Swan Lake.

The North Norfolk News visited Carmel at home on Tuesday, and gave her a big bag of loom bands to help her on her fund-raising journey.

Mum Natalie Doughty, 23, said Carmel had been to ballet classes at Marlene's School of Dance in Cromer. Now she cannot go, but wants to 'kick leukaemia up the backside.'

Carmel Lucas, 4, who has leukaemia and is now making and selling loom band bracelets to raise money

Carmel Lucas, 4, who has leukaemia and is now making and selling loom band bracelets to raise money for a leukaemia charity. Picture: ANTONY KELLY - Credit: Archant


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The family hope the Make a Wish foundation will help her fulfil her ballerina dream, but in the meantime, Carmel has been busy making bracelets to help others.

' said Miss Doughty. 'If we make enough bracelets there are a couple of local shops that will sell them.' The bracelets are white with an orange ribbon for leukaemia awareness, and when nurses visit Carmel for her regular checkups, she gives them each a white and orange loom-band bracelet to say thank you.

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Carmel was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in July, after Miss Doughty noticed she was sleepy, covered in bruises and had lumps on the back of her neck.

She spent a month at Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge undergoing intense chemotherapy.

After being re-admitted weeks later, Carmel finally returned home two weeks ago to begin a two-year course of the treatment.

Miss Doughty, has three other children, Hunter, three, Luna, one and Roman, five weeks, with her partner Conan, 27.

She said: 'The emotional side is the hardest because nothing else has to change, we just adapt to her needs.

'When you see her cry your heart breaks for her and you want to be able to take it away but you can't.

'She used to think she was Rapunzel because she had lovely long hair, but when she began chemotherapy she didn't want me to brush her hair because it would fall out.'

Carmel is too sick to attend school due to a low immune system, but Miss Doughty said she is eager to learn, and completes work at home.

'When I should have been taking pictures of her at school I couldn't and I just cried,' said Miss Doughty.

'I found her upstairs by the wardrobe the other day trying on her school uniform.

'She knows she has poorly blood, and Conan is good at explaining it to her in a way she understands,' she added.

Miss Doughty said her and Carmel were planning a make cakes for a Bake a Wish event, to raise money for the Make a Wish foundation.

Are you raising money for charity? Email sabah.meddings@archant.co.uk

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