ScottishPower Renewables inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers across Lowestoft

Students at East Point Academy experiment with the number of blades on a wind turbine. Pictures: Jam

Students at East Point Academy experiment with the number of blades on a wind turbine. Pictures: James Fletcher - Credit: Archant

Hundreds of children have learned about the importance of renewable energy during a series of hands-on science workshops.

Atomic Andy at Blundeston Primary School. Picture: Courtesy of Blundeston Primary

Atomic Andy at Blundeston Primary School. Picture: Courtesy of Blundeston Primary - Credit: Archant

Over the past few weeks ScottishPower Renewables have held Mad Science workshops and talks to promote a career in science and engineering.

With the workshops taking place at Blundeston Primary School, Elm Tree Primary Academy, Gunton Primary Academy and East Point Academy in Lowestoft, and schools in the Great Yarmouth area, almost 1,000 children in Norfolk and Suffolk have been inspired.

Students at East Point Academy learn about using air pressure to move objects. Pictures: James Fletc

Students at East Point Academy learn about using air pressure to move objects. Pictures: James Fletcher - Credit: Archant

Committed to inspiring the future generation of engineers and scientists to work in the offshore wind industry, ScottishPower Renewables organised these workshops as part of its East Anglia ONE Skills Strategy.

The developer has commenced onshore pre-construction work for its East Anglia ONE offshore windfarm, about 30 miles off the coast of Suffolk,

Atomic Andy at Blundeston Primary School. Picture: Courtesy of Blundeston Primary

Atomic Andy at Blundeston Primary School. Picture: Courtesy of Blundeston Primary - Credit: Archant


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Mad Science, which provides educational experiences for children, conducted assemblies and workshops packed with 'windy' science experiments. Pupils learnt about the difference between renewable and non-renewable energy, and the effects of high and low air pressure.

Careers talks were also given by ScottishPower Renewables' personnel, including an electrical engineer and environment manager, at East Norfolk Sixth Form College and Lowestoft College to raise awareness of the range of opportunities in the offshore wind sector.

Students at East Point Academy experiment with solar-powered crickets. Pictures: James Fletcher

Students at East Point Academy experiment with solar-powered crickets. Pictures: James Fletcher - Credit: Archant

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Charlie Jordan, project director for East Anglia ONE, said: 'East Anglia ONE is the first of four offshore projects we are planning off the coast of Suffolk and we're keen to develop a skilled, local workforce that can access the jobs these projects will bring to the region.'

At Blundeston Primary School, in Church Road, the children 'had a fantastic time,' according to teacher Edward Davey. He said: 'Atomic Andy taught us how long the reserves for coal, oil and gas have left before showing us the power of wind by generating electricity with a wind turbine and blowing cups off peoples head with an airzooka.

'Each year group then took part in activities learning about air pressure and how wind turbines are more efficient at making electricity with more blades.'

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