Resignations rock Fens wind farm plan

The fate of a £40m wind farm scheme in the Fens was unclear today after half of the consortium behind it resigned.Seven members of the 14-strong Marshland Wind Farm Consortium issued statements saying they were stepping down.

The fate of a £40m wind farm scheme in the Fens was unclear today after half of the consortium behind it resigned.

Seven members of the 14-strong Marshland Wind Farm Consortium issued statements saying they were stepping down.

This afternoon it was not clear whether or not the remaining seven members wished to proceed with the plan.

A statement, signed by Philip, Jean and David Didwell; Mary and Fred Judd; Richard Askew and Richard Carter, said: “We are therefore confirming in writing to your readers the below-named are no longer members of the Marshland Wind Farm Consortium.

“This will therefore mean the turbines planned for our land will not be built.”

Mrs Didwell said: “We've decided to withdraw for personal reasons. With any group of people there are different reasons, we just want closure.”

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A leaflet circulated to residents said an area of land near Moyse's Bank was being surveyed to see if there was sufficient wind to power turbines.

It said they could generate enough electricity for up to 26,000 homes and bring money to the community via an energy fund, which would redistribute some of the scheme's profits to community improvements.

“We as a group of landowners have been looking at ways in which we can diversify to bring better prosperity to the area and ourselves,” the letter said. “The group has considered all options and decided they would like to try to offset the harmful effects of climate change while securing our future as farmers.”

But the wind farm scheme was met by fierce opposition in Marshland. And the scheme was also blamed for one of Labour's biggest upsets in last week's local elections, when Jack Bantoft, its leader on West Norfolk council, was beaten in the ward he had held for 18 years by anti-wind farm campaigner David Markinson, who stood as an Independent.

Today Mr Markinson said: “Obviously on behalf of the villagers I am delighted that it appears people are moving away from the development.

“People have been against this proposal from day one and in my view these people will be delighted with the news.

“There are still several other people involved with the consortium and how this will effect the extent of the project I do not know.”

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