Remembrance events permitted but will not take place as normal this year

Remembrance Sunday events are allowed to go ahead this year but many will be scaled back. Picture: I

Remembrance Sunday events are allowed to go ahead this year but many will be scaled back. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: Archant

Remembrance Sunday events are allowed to go ahead this year despite the new coronavirus lockdown, but many in Norfolk will not take place as normal.

A Remembrance Sunday service held at the Tower Gardens in King's Lynn. Picture: Ian Burt

A Remembrance Sunday service held at the Tower Gardens in King's Lynn. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: Archant

Local authorities, faith leaders and members of the Royal British Legion are permitted to organise outdoor events to safely mark Remembrance Sunday on November 8 and Armistice Day on November 11 at a public war memorial or cenotaph.

But government guidelines published specifically for Remembrance, state events should be short and focussed on wreath-laying, while a march or parade can take place if attendees are socially distanced.

Those legally permitted to attend events as participants include those attending as part of their work, such as local councillors, faith leaders, members of the armed forces and veterans.

While people are legally permitted to stop and watch as spectators, reasonable steps should be taken to “minimise wider public viewing”.

Remembrance Sunday events are allowed to go ahead this year despite the new coronavirus lockdown, bu

Remembrance Sunday events are allowed to go ahead this year despite the new coronavirus lockdown, but many in Norfolk will not take place as normal. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: Archant


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In Norfolk, a number of the county’s councils have altered events in order to avoid public gatherings.

In South Norfolk and Broadland the chairmen of both local authorities will be laying wreaths in their respective wards but there will be no council organised events.

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In North Norfolk, there will be no public events but parking has been made free across the district to allow the public to pay their respects should they wish.

A spokesperson for North Norfolk District Council, said: “The leader, chief executive and chairman of the council will each lay a wreath at the Poppies in Steel memorial at the NNDC offices. The event will be private, but will be filmed and released for viewing.”

While in Great Yarmouth, people are being asked to observe a two-minute silence from home on Remembrance Sunday and place a poppy in their window.

Hugh King, the chairman of the Norfolk branch of the Royal British Legion, said most branches across the county “would be doing something”. He said the group would also be laying a wreath at the war memorial in Norwich at an undisclosed time on Remembrance Sunday.

Mr King said: “We are unable to much about Remembrance this year and that’s sad but next year is the RBL’s 100th anniversary so we can make up for it.”

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