Rail season-ticket prices in Norfolk set to rise by 4.2pc – what do you think?

Rail passengers in Norfolk have been advised to buy their 2013 season tickets before the new year – or face an average rise of 4.2pc.

Rail passengers in Norfolk have been advised to buy their 2013 season tickets before the new year – or face an average rise of 4.2pc.

Price increases due to come into effect in January will see the cost of an annual Norwich-London ticket break the �7,000 barrier for the first time, rising from �6,900 to �7,184.

Despite anger from passenger groups, the rises are less than those feared earlier in the year, when rises of up to 6pc were proposed for Greater Anglia's regulated routes.

However, government capped the operator's average rise at 1pc above inflation, currently running at 3.2pc. The cap had previously been set at 3pc above inflation.


You may also want to watch:


What do you think of the price rises? Leave your comments below this story.

Passenger Focus, the passenger watchdog, criticised the rises and urged commuters to save money by buying season tickets before they go up on January 1.

Most Read

Chief executive Anthony Smith said: 'Passengers will feel this pain. After years of above-inflation fare rises, fresh increases are piling pressure on already high fares. Government and the rail industry must now work together to deliver on the welcome promise to get fare rises in line with inflation.'

A spokesman for Greater Anglia said average regulated fares had risen by 4.2pc, the maximum permitted.

Full details of off-peak and unregulated fares will be announced at the start of December.

What do you think of the price rises? Leave your comments below this story.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus