Potential new line in Great Yarmouth cold case investigation

Peter Miller, who was stabbed to death in Great Yarmouth.

Peter Miller, who was stabbed to death in Great Yarmouth. - Credit: Supplied

The brother of a man murdered in 1984 has reached out to a woman he believes could have vital information to shed light on the cold case.

Peter Miller unsolved murder in December 1984 in Great Yarmouth.Number 10 Camden PlacePicture: James

Peter Miller unsolved murder in December 1984 in Great Yarmouth.Number 10 Camden PlacePicture: James Bass - Credit: James Bass

Peter Miller, 24, was found stabbed to death on the kitchen floor of his Great Yarmouth home on December 9, 1984. His brother, Tony Miller, has long campaigned for justice after it emerged that police no longer had 170 case exhibits.

And last week he handed out over 300 leaflets outside Great Yarmouth Police Station in an appeal for information.

'Justice has been stolen from Peter,' he said. 'That's the way I look at it. Evidence has gone missing that can never be replaced and I believe it's cut our chances down of getting a conviction.'

He said he wanted closure for the family, including their mother Sylvia, 80. 'I'm angry, frustrated and closure is my goal,' he added. 'If I'm totally honest with myself I think we've lost any chance of closure, but that's not going to stop me looking and asking.'

Great Yarmouth muder victim Peter Miller. Pictured: Drains near Peter Miller's home are searched. D

Great Yarmouth muder victim Peter Miller. Pictured: Drains near Peter Miller's home are searched. Date: Dec 1984 - Credit: Archant

Since renewing the appeal, Mr Miller has been contacted through his Facebook page 'Unsolved Norfolk Murder Case', where he posts updates about the murder.

Peter Miller was found stabbed at the family home in Camden Place, having last been seen by a neighbour in the afternoon.

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Investigations led to a number of other arrests, but no-one was ever charged, and the case remains unsolved 31 years on.

'I've heard from a woman who was 16 at the time and was apparently having a piano lesson next door, I think it's worth the police speaking to her but I don't think it will solve the case,' said Mr Miller, 54.

'But I've also had some information about a woman who we think made an initial call to the police in 1984 with some information. She wanted to speak to the female police officer but wasn't allowed to, so she hung up, and we never heard anything from her again.

'I'm hoping I've located her, it's a new line of enquiry for me, and now I'm reaching out by writing her an open letter to come forward.'

Because so much evidence was found to be missing, Mr Miller thinks that only if new people come forward will there be any chance of the case being solved.

Detective inspector Marie James said she accepted that a number of exhibits had been destroyed and that this was 'frustrating'. She said she could not comment on the reasons why, but believed that what happened did not 'fatally flaw' the investigation and encouraged members of the community to come forward.