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Council debates ‘quieter fireworks’ and noise cap following wildlife fears

PUBLISHED: 12:55 21 February 2020 | UPDATED: 12:55 21 February 2020

Councillors debated encouraging the use of quieter fireworks and introducing a noise level cap due to concerns over the impact on vulnerable people and animals. Picture: Sonya Duncan/Denise Bradley

Councillors debated encouraging the use of quieter fireworks and introducing a noise level cap due to concerns over the impact on vulnerable people and animals. Picture: Sonya Duncan/Denise Bradley

Sonya Duncan/Denise Bradley

Councillors debated encouraging the use of “quieter fireworks” and introducing a noise level cap due to concerns over the impact on vulnerable people and animals.

Broadland district councillors discussed a motion calling for all public firework displays to be advertised in advance and to bring in the noise-limiting measures. Pictured, fireworks in Cromer. Photo: Sonya DuncanBroadland district councillors discussed a motion calling for all public firework displays to be advertised in advance and to bring in the noise-limiting measures. Pictured, fireworks in Cromer. Photo: Sonya Duncan

Broadland district councillors discussed a motion calling for all public firework displays to be advertised in advance and to bring in the noise-limiting measures.

The plans were brought to a Broadland District Council (BDC) meeting on Thursday, February 20 by Judy Leggett (Conservative).

The motion asked the council to consider resolving "to encourage all public firework displays within the local authority boundaries to be advertised in advance of the event, allowing residents to take precautions for their animals and vulnerable people, to actively promote a public awareness campaign about the impact of fireworks on animal welfare and vulnerable people, including the precautions that can be taken to mitigate risks, to write to the UK government urging them to introduce legislation to limit the maximum noise level of fireworks to 90dB for those sold to the public for private displays, and to encourage local suppliers of fireworks to stock 'quieter' fireworks for public display".

READ MORE: Council debates 'lasers' and 'quiet fireworks' to prevent harm to animals

Conservative councillor Ken Leggett said he was concerned animals could seriously injure themselves. Pictured, baby hedgehogs at the Suffolk Hedgehog Hospital. Photo: Denise BradleyConservative councillor Ken Leggett said he was concerned animals could seriously injure themselves. Pictured, baby hedgehogs at the Suffolk Hedgehog Hospital. Photo: Denise Bradley

And Ken Leggett (Conservative) said: "I fully support the motion following numerous calls from local residents.

"As the tenant of a small meadow with sub-tenants with animals, it is really most important that we address this.

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"Animals don't only suffer psychologically but cause serious injuries to themselves as they attempt to run away and hide."

He added: "Could we add that we require firework packaging to be labelled according to noise levels?

"Can that be added as part of the requirement to government?"

Chairman Karen Vincent (Conservative) said the council could request the government do so, but not require it, and added: "I would question the enforceability of this."

And Justine Thomas (Conservative) added: "I believe firework packaging should give the maximum decibel of the fireworks inside.

"Fireworks are category labelled. Don't quote me on that - I'm not an industry expert."

The motion, which was seconded by Trudy Mancini Boyle (Conservative) was carried after a vote was taken.

No councillors voted against the motion but there were five abstentions on the plans.

READ MORE: Council debates use of 'silent fireworks' to stop pet and wildlife distress


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