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Charity fears losing 71pc of its income due to coronavirus pandemic

PUBLISHED: 10:30 11 September 2020 | UPDATED: 10:57 11 September 2020

Zena Mingaye, Louise Slaughter, Barry Loosley, Janet Loosley, Ros Greenwood, John Greenwood at a charity table top sale

Zena Mingaye, Louise Slaughter, Barry Loosley, Janet Loosley, Ros Greenwood, John Greenwood at a charity table top sale

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A cancer charity facing a “possible tsunami” of demand to help cancer patients in Norfolk fears it could see a 71pc drop this year in its income due to the pandemic.

Boots staff members have fun during the shop's Macmillan cancer charity day.  Left to right: Caroline De-Tarrier, Tina Smith, Carys Batson, Lynn Bartle,  Ana Barcena and Angela Yiasimi.  Picture: ANDREAS YIASIMIBoots staff members have fun during the shop's Macmillan cancer charity day. Left to right: Caroline De-Tarrier, Tina Smith, Carys Batson, Lynn Bartle, Ana Barcena and Angela Yiasimi. Picture: ANDREAS YIASIMI

Macmillan Cancer Support supporters raise £27.5m in 2019 through its annual coffee mornings, but the charity said this could fall below £8m due to the pandemic.

It would be the lowest amount the coffee morning will have raised in 11 years.

Instead of the traditional coffee morning, participants can host a socially distanced event from their doorstep or virtually.

In Norfolk, £351,300 was raised through such events, including £50,000 in Norwich and £48,600 in North Norfolk.

Ian Rose Royal navy submariner walking through Great Yarmouth marketplace in full scuba diving gear to raise money for Macmillan. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMAN

Ian Rose Royal navy submariner walking through Great Yarmouth marketplace in full scuba diving gear to raise money for Macmillan. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMAN

Ruth Godfrey, from Barnham, was diagnosed with breast cancer at the end of 2019, a month before the death of her dad from cancer.

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The 55-year-old will be holding a virtual event offering free positive mindset training alongside refreshments.

She said: “Macmillan has been a huge part of helping me through lockdown, chemo and cancer during these past few months. They’ve been at the end of a phone line for advice not only for me, but also my family.

“One day in particular stands out when I was on my third round of chemotherapy and I made a cup of tea and got teary because I couldn’t remember the last time I’d had a drink with somebody. Then I drank the tea and I thought the milk had gone off, but it hadn’t, the chemo had affected my taste. I was just sobbing and I rang Macmillan.”

Through their support in one of her “lowest moments” the 55-year-old wanted to do something in return.

Melanie Humphreys, Macmillan’s regional fundraising manager in Norfolk, said: “There has never been a more terrifying time in recent history to receive a cancer diagnosis with disruption and delays to treatment and fears of increased risk of becoming infected with coronavirus.

“At Macmillan we’re facing a possible tsunami of demand coming towards us this autumn, as the cancer system gets moving again and the backlog of delayed diagnoses begins to be dealt with.”

Advice is available from the charity on how to hold a socially distanced event. Or participants can sign up to run, walk or cycle for the charity instead.

To sign up, visit coffee.macmillan.org.uk or call 0330 102 7810.


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