Photo gallery: Miracle baby Ethan, 1lb 1oz, so tiny mum was scared of “breaking him”

Ethan Michael Bird, pictured, has been in the neo-natal intensive care unit at the Norwich and Norfo

Ethan Michael Bird, pictured, has been in the neo-natal intensive care unit at the Norwich and Norfolk for four months, but will soon be going home. - Credit: Archant

When little Ethan Bird came into the world weighing just 1lb 1oz he faced a battle to survive.

Ethan, born at 26 weeks, is slowly gaining strength and getting bigger.

Ethan, born at 26 weeks, is slowly gaining strength and getting bigger. - Credit: Archant

Not much heavier than a bag of sugar at only 26 weeks old, the tiny premature baby was born via emergency caesarean section on December 5 last year after mum Sarah, 34, developed pre-eclampsia which developed into life-threatening eclampsia.

It has been an uphill struggle at times but this week, after four months of fighting to gain strength, baby Ethan took a step closer to finally going home.

Now weighing 6lb 10oz, he has moved out of the neo-natal intensive care unit at the Norwich and Norfolk University Hospital (NNUH) and to the neo-natal unit at the James Paget University Hospital (JPH) in Gorleston where he will receive transitional care.

They don't have a date for going home yet, but it is a milestone for Sarah, who works at Great Yarmouth College as a trainee and assessor for apprentices, and her husband Scott, manager at Thrigby Hall wildlife gardens in Filby.


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'He has a real strong character,' said Sarah.

'He's stubborn and strong minded, like he's got a bit of that fighting spirit in him.'

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To thank the nurses and staff, Ethan's aunt Claire Vickers, a designer, is selling prints of a First Alphabet poster she made as a present for little Ethan.

Copies are being sold for £20 with £5 going to the neo-natal ICU. For more information and to buy prints go to www.clairevickers.co.uk.

• See Friday's paper for the full story.

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