Photo gallery: Fake crash teaches young people about road safety

Norfolk Police and Fire Service gave a demonstration to the pupils of Northgate High School what wou

Norfolk Police and Fire Service gave a demonstration to the pupils of Northgate High School what would happen at the scene of someone trapped after a RTA - Head Teacher Glyn Hambling is cut from the car. Picture: Matthew Usher. - Credit: Matthew Usher

Norfolk's police and the fire service gave a hard-hitting road safety message yesterday when they recreated a crash in a school playground.

Norfolk Police and Fire Service gave a demonstration to the pupils of Northgate High School what wou

Norfolk Police and Fire Service gave a demonstration to the pupils of Northgate High School what would happen at the scene of someone trapped after a RTA. Picture: Matthew Usher. - Credit: Matthew Usher

The emergency services simulated a road traffic accident with a car, a motorbike and two injured people whilst officers acted as they would during a real-life situation.

Chief Inspector Chris Spinks, head of roads policing in Norfolk and Suffolk, said he hoped the exercise at Northgate High School in Dereham would be a regular annual occurrence across the county.

'We are trying to find ways to get to the children and make them think that accidents could happen to them or someone they know' he said.

'Part of the message is about the children being responsible when they are out and about with parents, friends and carers.


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'We hope that the message will be spread when the children are in cars across Norfolk.'

From drink-drivng, to speeding, using mobile phones whilst driving and wearing headphones whilst crossing the road, the officers gave advise and safety ideas to the seven to 10-year-old pupils at the school.

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Headteacher Glyn Hambling was one of those who played an injured driver during the day's event.

The car he was in had its windows smashed, front windscreen cut out and the roof cut-off by the fire crew from Dereham.

'It was quite an unbelievable experience - and even by having this awareness it might just save one person's life', he said.

Geroge Chetwood, in year eight at the school, said he was surprised how quickly the crews worked to make the car scene safe.

'Now I have seen what happens, I will be more aware of the dangers on the road' he said.

Brett Hopcroft, operational support officer for the fire service said: 'Unfortunately it seems we will never stop road traffic accidents from happening, but if events such as this can reduce them, then we've made a difference for the good.'

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