Photo gallery: 100 years of Cromer and Sheringham Operatic and Dramatic Society - and a plea for your memorabilia

The Cromer and Sheringham Operatic and Dramatic Society celebrate their 100th anniversary. Singin' i

The Cromer and Sheringham Operatic and Dramatic Society celebrate their 100th anniversary. Singin' in the Rain, 2010.PHOTO: submitted - Credit: Archant

Young men were heading off to fight for their country 100 years ago.

The Cromer and Sheringham Operatic and Dramatic Society celebrate their 100th anniversary. Margery D

The Cromer and Sheringham Operatic and Dramatic Society celebrate their 100th anniversary. Margery Dene, 1914.PHOTO: submitted - Credit: Archant

But amid the overtures for the First World War, other folk in Cromer were preparing for a happier event – and the birth of a society which has entertained generations of people ever since.

Cromer and Sherngham Operatic Society, Miss Me Kate 2000. Picture; ERIC BRICKLES

Cromer and Sherngham Operatic Society, Miss Me Kate 2000. Picture; ERIC BRICKLES - Credit: Archant

In May 1914 the Cromer Operatic and Dramatic Society staged a self-penned production called Margery Dene in the town hall.

The Cromer and Sheringham Operatic and Dramatic Society celebrate their 100th anniversary. Quaker Gi

The Cromer and Sheringham Operatic and Dramatic Society celebrate their 100th anniversary. Quaker Girl, 1967.PHOTO: submitted - Credit: Archant

The theme has been lost in the mists of time, but it set the scene for a vibrant society which began staging Gilbert and Sullivan light operettas, but is now best known for its signature spring musical on Cromer Pier, along with dramas staged at its other home, Sheringham Little Theatre.

Cromer and Sheringham Operatic Society centenary. Nick Bird as Fagin with some of his gang in Oliver

Cromer and Sheringham Operatic Society centenary. Nick Bird as Fagin with some of his gang in Oliver! Picture: ERIC BRICKLES - Credit: Archant

The group survived two world wars – with short breaks while battles were fought – and two serious batterings of the pier by the 1953 flood and a runaway rig 40 years later.


You may also want to watch:


It also changed names to the Cromer and Sheringham Players in 1923, the Cromer and Sheringham Amateur Operatic Society in 1949 and it recently dropped the amateur tag.

Chairman Andrew Payne said some early minutes from the 1930s showed concerns over covering show costs amounting to £50 – while today's slick musicals had a price tag of about £45,000.

Most Read

'People don't realise that a small- scale am dram show costs so much – from royalties to theatre, costume and orchestra fees.'

Mr Payne, who has done 34 years with the society, said the key to its enduring success was the family atmosphere, teamwork and people being prepared to help behind the scenes even if they were not performing on stage.

Long-serving member Janet Nightingale, who joined in 1965 and went on to be secretary for 13 years and chairman for 10, said 'It was not so sophisticated in those days. We only had a few mics on the front of the stage, so we had to project our voices.

'But it was great fun – with friendships made for life, parties on the stage at the end of the show and we went home with the milkman.'

Both are involved with the centenary year music Oliver! currently in rehearsal – Janet as a housekeeper, Andrew as stage manager.

The show was chosen for the big year because it was box office smash – and was also helping the society build up its funds after some leaner times just a few years ago, added Mr Payne.

The centenary was 'a nice opportunity to look back' for the society which has won a string of awards over the years, but also a chance to get people involved for the future.'

There were 40 children involved in Oliver! – which was also vital to getting new generations of members to push the society towards its second centenary, he said.

Amateur societies were finding it difficult to find 'do-able' new musicals – to make a change from the tried and tested favourites – as many of the current professional shows involved high technology.

'Flying cars are a bit of challenge for groups like us, so we are waiting for shows like Blood Brothers which are more straightforward without technical wizardry,' said Mr Payne.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus