Plans submitted over bid to introduce parking charges at Roman Fort

Burgh Castle Roman Fort.Picture: James BassCopy: M PollittFor: EDP NewsEastern Daily Press © 2010 (

The ruins at Burgh Castle are popular with dog walkers who might soon have to pay to park when they take their daily exercise. - Credit: Eastern Daily Press © 2010

Budget pressures are forcing the guardians of some of Norfolk's  most  treasured heritage assets to introduce parking charges at its sites.

Norfolk Archaeological Trust (NAT) manages multiple sites across the county spanning burial mounds, forts, and monasteries, all of which are free to enter.

The charity says its small membership and changes to the way it is funded have resulted in a dip in income.

Views from the new boardwalk that has been installed at Bugh Castle Roman Fort.Picture: Nick Butcher

Views from the new boardwalk that has been installed at Bugh Castle Roman Fort.Picture: Nick Butcher - Credit: Nick Butcher

To make up the shortfall and allow it to maintain its sites and keep them open to the public it is proposing to charge for parking.

The first of its sites bidding to introduce fees is Burgh Castle Roman Fort, which is popular with dog walkers many of whom tread its trails daily.

Documents submitted to Great Yarmouth Borough Council in support of the bid say the income is much-needed to pay for upkeep and maintenance.

Burgh Castle is an easy one-mile circular walk where you can explore the surroundings Picture: Nick

Burgh Castle is an easy one-mile circular walk where you can explore the surroundings Picture: Nick Butcher - Credit: Nick Butcher

It also wants to install a number plate recognition camera to deter fly-tippers and cut criminal damage.

The trust said it had engaged with the public and listened to feedback.

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As a result likely charges would be £1.50 for two hours, £2 for four, and £4 all day.

Brian Swan, chairman of Belton with Burgh Castle Parish Council said he understood the trust's position but had concerns about safety with people parking on narrow Butt Lane to avoid paying.

The clash of cars and people with dogs had the potential to cause a serious accident, he said.

NAT’s director, Natalie Butler said in a statement: “We think that introducing better car park management at the Fort site will also bring benefits to the local community. 

"The last few months have seen some difficult challenges at the Burgh Castle Fort site, with anti-social behaviour, criminal damage, an escalation of fly-tipping and littering, and visitors’ cars occupying the car park long after it should officially have been closed. We think that our plans for managing the Fort car park will reduce these issues and provide a safer site for local people.” 

People have until December 7 to have their say.

Telling the story of Norfolk

NAT's other sites are:


Lime-rich Roman walls which survive at Venta Icenorum at Caistor St Edmund near Norwich have been de

Lime-rich Roman walls which survive at Venta Icenorum at Caistor St Edmund near Norwich have been designated nature reserves. - Credit: Eastern Counties Newspapers

Caistor Roman Town - once the largest Roman town in East Anglia

St Benet's Abbey - an atmospheric ruin on the Norfolk Broads near Ludham

Burnham Norton Friary - a 14th century gatehouse

Bloodgates Hill Fort - an iron age fort describe as "enigmatic"

Fiddler's Hill Barrow - a prehistoric burial mound

Buttercups colour the grass at Binham Priory. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Buttercups colour the grass at Binham Priory. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: DENISE BRADLEY/Archant2021

Binham Priory - one of Norfolk's finest monastic sites

Filby Chapel - the site of unitarian church an 18th century grave slabs

Middleton Mount - the remains of a small motte and bailey castle

Tasburgh Enclosure - a "mysterious" site and the least understood of the trust's monuments.

To find out more about Norfolk Archaeological Trust or to donate visit the website at www.norfarchtrust.org.uk.

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