Paralympic skier puts Watton primary school pupils through their paces

GB Paralympic Skiier Sean Rose took charge of a circuit challenge at Wayland Junior School. Picture:

GB Paralympic Skiier Sean Rose took charge of a circuit challenge at Wayland Junior School. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: Ian Burt

Primary school pupils were put through their paces when a Paralympic skier led a sponsored circuit challenge at their school.

GB Paralympic Skiier Sean Rose took charge of a circuit challenge at Wayland Junior School. Picture:

GB Paralympic Skiier Sean Rose took charge of a circuit challenge at Wayland Junior School. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: Ian Burt

The students at Wayland Junior Academy in Watton were visited by Sean Rose, a double winter Paralympian with five World Cup medals, seven British titles and over 30 international medals.

Mr Rose led pupils from Years 3, 4, 5 and 6 in a sponsored fitness activity, through which the school was raising money for new PE equipment, then gave them a motivational assembly about his life experiences.

Mr Rose said: 'It was a really great activity. You can see it on the kids' faces that they love it. You feed off their energy.'

A former RAF physical training instructor, Mr Rose was paralysed as a result of a skiing accident in 2000.

The father of two has since gone on to become a world class skier, adventurer, TV presenter and pundit, and pilot.

He has spent the past three years working with Sport For Schools, which sees international and Olympic athletes visit primary school pupils, making regular visits to schools in Cambridgeshire, Norfolk and Suffolk.

Most Read

'Once I'd finished with competitive racing, I felt like I had achieved my goals and dreams, and this was a new challenge,' he said.

'I love the schools, mainly because of the questions the children ask after I deliver my talk. And I love doing the circuits because it brings me back to my roots as a trainer in the RAF.'

On his visit to Wayland Junior Academy Mr Rose brought with him his custom-made ski seat, which was designed when he began skiing again in Colorado just a year after his accident, supported by spinal injuries charity Back Up Trust.

'I didn't know if I would enjoy it the same way, but being back in the mountains, being out of my wheelchair and feeling independent again was amazing,' he said.

'The message we're trying to get across to the kids is that there is always a challenge waiting. There are always things that will push you and make you better. And if you don't try, you won't know.'

Ellise Owen, PE coordinator at Wayland Junior Academy, said: 'It is completely humbling and awe-inspiring to have Sean here.

'I think it is such a fantastic opportunity for the kids for them to see what they can be capable of, being fully capable themselves and seeing someone who isn't.

'Being able to instil that in the kids is amazing, you can't buy that.

'It's about motivating them as much as you can. The kids here are very reciprocal of anything PE related. They tackle anything you throw at them.

'But it's not just about exercise – it's a case of drip-feeding them lessons about their general wellbeing and healthiness.'

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter