Organisers issue survival guide to the Tour de Broads

Organisers of the Tour de Broads have issued a survival guide for participants taking part in this y

Organisers of the Tour de Broads have issued a survival guide for participants taking part in this years iconic cycle challenge. Picture: Julian Claxton Photographer - Credit: Archant

Organisers of the Tour de Broads have issued a survival guide for participants taking part in this year's iconic cycle challenge.

Kate Warner. Picture: Pedal Revolution

Kate Warner. Picture: Pedal Revolution - Credit: Archant

With under a week to go to the August 20 event, many cyclists will be worried about their level of fitness.

However, organisers said: 'The general understanding with endurance training is that so long as you can complete 75pc of the distance before the event, adrenalin will carry you through.

'That said, many cyclists will gain confidence from knowing they've already completed a similar distance.

'Be sure to allow for a few easy or rest days before the event.'

Neil Turner. Picture: Pedal Revolution

Neil Turner. Picture: Pedal Revolution - Credit: Archant


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Clothing

Kate Warner, the store manager at Pedal Revolution in Norwich, said comfortable clothing will go a long way to ensuring you have a comfortable ride.

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Suggested items include a jersey that's breathable and wicks sweat, and has pockets at the rear to allow you to carry essential items.

She said: 'Wear shorts with quality padding that you've ridden in before. It's a good idea to have a gilet or packable jacket in case the wind gets up or it rains.

Helen Rainbow. Picture: Pedal Revolution

Helen Rainbow. Picture: Pedal Revolution - Credit: Archant

'Good quality mitts or gloves will also prevent road buzz (vibrations) from numbing your hands and protect them should you fall.'

Of course don't forget your helmet.

Nutrition

She said when it comes to nutrition, although there would be several food and refreshment stations along the way, it is also a good idea to carry enough food and drink to go the distance.

Organisers of the Tour de Broads have issued a survival guide for participants taking part in this y

Organisers of the Tour de Broads have issued a survival guide for participants taking part in this years iconic cycle challenge. Picture: Julian Claxton Photography - Credit: Archant

'Energy drinks, gels and bars are easy to consume for most. Generally energy drinks provide carbohydrates and electrolytes, and get into your system quickest.'

Gels are the next quickest, and also contain some electrolytes to help ward off cramp.

Bars are slower to be absorbed but feel more like real, wholesome food.

It's all about the bike

Organisers of the Tour de Broads have issued a survival guide for participants taking part in this y

Organisers of the Tour de Broads have issued a survival guide for participants taking part in this years iconic cycle challenge. Picture: Julian Claxton Photographer - Credit: Archant

Although a mechanic and broom wagon will be on call during the day, a well-oiled machine will make your ride a lot more pleasant, said Pedal Revolution co-owner Neil Turner.

He said: 'A week before the event is the perfect time to service your bike – either on your own or by our qualified mechanics in store.

'Check your gears are working properly, your tyres are inflated to the right pressure and are in good order to avoid suffering repeat punctures.

'Make sure your chain is clean and lubed and that your brake pads have plenty of tread left on them.'

Remember that a clean bike is a quick bike.

Riding in a group

Helen Rainbow, the event manager for Tour de Broads, said from a safety perspective it was important that participants were prepared for riding in a group.

She said: 'A sportive is usually a solo effort and most riders will be aiming for a solo achievement.

'However, the roads are not closed so you'll be sharing the highway with other road users as well as the 3,000 cyclists we're expecting to take part in this year's Tour de Broads.'

The route

The four routes for the cycle challenge were recently announced.

The start and finish will take place on the Hoveton Hall estate and the routes follow a figure of eight, meaning participants will never be more than 25 miles from base - with a mid-way stop for lunch to dine and enjoy the splendour of the estate.

The recreational ride, which is suitable for all ages, abilities and every possible type of bicycle, is again being run on a not-for-profit basis to support local cycling projects. The projects include GYBP, the Pedal Revolution Scholarship programme and cycling in schools.

An estimated £60,000 was raised last year.

Consisting of four routes of different distances - 25, 50, 75 and 100 miles - the longest two routes head to Happisburgh and along the coast enjoying views of the lighthouse and Horsey Windpump.

The RNLI will welcome riders to The Lifeboat station at Happisburgh, the first stop on the 100 and 75-mile routes. Just 14 miles into the ride, the fastest cyclists should start arriving from about 8.45am.

Turning inland at Hemsby, riders will then cross Ormesby, Rollesby and Filby Broads and head back to Hoveton Hall for some food.

From there, those taking part in the 100 miler head for Reedham and pass through the beautiful Broadland villages of South Walsham, Ranworth, Woodbastwick and Wroxham.

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