Mum's socks display idea for Down's syndrome goes global

Emma Taylor and her family, sons, Eli, six; and Logan, 12; and her husband Chris; who are organising

Emma Taylor and her family, sons, Eli, six; and Logan, 12; and her husband Chris; who are organising a Lots of Socks poster trail for World Down Syndrome Day, where children can colour in the posters and display them in their windows. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: DENISE BRADLEY/Archant2021

Windows around the world will be decorated with colourful socks to raise awareness of Down's syndrome thanks to a Norwich mother.

Emma Taylor, 39, whose son Eli Taylor, six, has Down's syndrome, hopes the poster trail will spark a conversation and help the wider population learn more about the genetic condition.

It coincides with World Down's Syndrome Day on March 21 and anyone can take part by printing off a specially designed poster of pairs of socks on a washing line from the Lots of Socks Trail Facebook page.

Odd pairs of socks are used as a symbol for the awareness day due to chromosomes being shaped like socks. People with Down's syndrome are born with an extra chromosome 21.

Emma Taylor and her family, sons, Eli, six; and Logan, 12; and her husband Chris; who are organising

Emma Taylor and her family, sons, Eli, six; and Logan, 12; and her husband Chris; who are organising a Lots of Socks poster trail for World Down Syndrome Day, where children can colour in the posters and display them in their windows. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: DENISE BRADLEY/Archant2021

Mrs Taylor, from Windsor Park Gardens in Old Catton, who also as a 12-year-old boy, said: "Down's syndrome is one of those disabilities that has a lot of stigma and negativity around it. There isn't a lot known about it."

The mum-of-two, who is deputy manager of Old Catton Pre-School, organised the trail to celebrate people with Down's syndrome as the usual annual get-together on March 21 cannot happen due to coronavirus restrictions.

"I didn't want it to be a nothing day. I needed to do something. I thought it would be nice to have washing lines full of odd funky socks in out windows. It is something everyone can get behind and about acceptance," she added.

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Mrs Taylor is encouraging people to colour in the socks and put up the posters throughout March and communities abroad have taken up the idea.

Her son's condition was diagnosed soon after he was born and she admitted feeling anxious and afraid after researching Down's syndrome online.

But she said her son was doing phenomenally and enjoys activities like horse riding and swimming.

One of the Lots of Socks posters, to colour in and display in a trail for World Down Syndrome Day, o

One of the Lots of Socks posters, to colour in and display in a trail for World Down Syndrome Day, organised by the Taylor family. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: DENISE BRADLEY/Archant2021

Mrs Taylor added: "He is a persistent and determined little dude."

A spokesperson for the Down's Syndrome Association said: “We are delighted that Emma’s sock trail has been picked up and enjoyed across the globe. There are around 40,000 people across the UK who have Down’s syndrome, and we want to ensure that more and more people advocate for their rights and inclusion in society."

To celebrate World Down's Syndrome Day Norwich City Hall and the Assembly House will be lit up blue and yellow.

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