Three of the most 'captivating' places given listed status in 2020

Some of the sites which have been listed status in 2020 by Historic England.

Some of the sites which have been listed status in 2020 by Historic England. From left to right, Ketts Castle Villa, the Beauchamp Lifeboat Memorial and the old post office in Somerleyton. - Credit: Patricia Payne/Historic England Archive

A lifeboat memorial and castle villa have been listed among the most captivating places which have been given listed status this year.

More than 100 places in the east of England have been added to the National Heritage List for England, a database of listed buildings, historic parks and other heritage assets, in 2020. 

And the body has selected a handful of the most "captivating" sites, including three in Norfolk and Suffolk.

Beauchamp Lifeboat Memorial, East and West Caister Village Cemetery, Ormesby Road, Ca

Beauchamp Lifeboat Memorial, at East and West Caister Village Cemetery. - Credit: Historic England Archive

Beauchamp Lifeboat Memorial in Caister - Grade II listed

Sat in the East and West Caister Village Cemetery, was unveiled in 1903 to remember nine crews members who died during a rescue mission in 1901.

The first lifeboat in Caister dates back to 1845, and the Beauchamp lifeboat was brought into service in 1892.

But on a stormy night in 1901, the Beauchamp was launched in response to distress signals coming from a ship towards Barber Sands.

The wreckage of Caister lifeboat Beauchamp was finally broken up in 1966. She capsized on a rescue l

The wreckage of Caister lifeboat Beauchamp was finally broken up in 1966. She capsized on a rescue launch in 1901, with the death of nine of her crew Picture: Archant Library - Credit: Archant

The crew got the boat afloat, but it capsized en route, trapping the crew beneath and claiming nine lives.

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When asked, during the inquest, why they persevered, the three surviving crew responded: “Going back is against the rules when we see distress signals like that”, which the press abbreviated to “Caister men never turn back".

The crews' names and ages are now engraved on names around the base.

Places - CCaister-On-Sea LifeboatThe lifeboat monument in Caister cemetery. Nine men of Caister wh

Places - CCaister-On-Sea LifeboatThe lifeboat monument in Caister cemetery. Nine men of Caister who lost their lives in the lifeboat 'Beauchamp' on the morning of 14th November 1901.Dated July 1952Plate P9362

A pub in Caister called Never Turn Back in tribute to the tragedy was given listed status in 2018

Ketts Castle Villa and Garden, at 113 St. Leonard's Road in Thorpe Hamlet.

Ketts Castle Villa and Garden, at 113 St. Leonard's Road, has been declared one of the most interesting buildings to be given listed protection in 2020. - Credit: Patricia Payne/Historic England Archive

Ketts Castle Villa and Garden, Norwich, Norfolk – Grade II listed

Built in 1957, the little-altered villa is believed to have been designed by, and built for, painter John Berney Ladbrooke.

He was an artist in the Norwich school of painting, a British landscape movement founded in 1803 by a small group of self-taught, working class artists based around Norwich, including his father, Robert Ladbrooke.

The school’s work included landscapes and scenes of rural life, which some commentators have described as a forerunner to both French Impressionism and also to the Newlyn School of Painting in Cornwall.

Archway leading to south entrance of Ketts Castle and Villa, in Thorpe Hamlet, which has this year been given listed status.

Archway leading to south entrance of Ketts Castle and Villa, in Thorpe Hamlet, which has this year been given listed status. - Credit: Patricia Payne/Historic England Archive

It is likely that he chose the location of the villa for the commanding view down to Norwich. The artist’s studio tower offers panoramic views towards Norwich, the trees in the garden below and the distant ruins of St Michael’s Chapel to the west.

Its steep hillside gardens include lawned gardens, a terrace and a serpentine path.

The old Post Office, on The Street in Somerleyton. In 2020 it was given listed status by Historic England.

The old Post Office, on The Street in Somerleyton. In 2020 it was given listed status by Historic England. - Credit: Patricia Payne/Historic England Archive

Japonica and The Nook and former Post Office and Store, Somerleyton, Suffolk – Grade II listed

In 1844, the Somerleyton Estate was bought by Sir Samuel Morton Peto, a man who started his career as a bricklayer before becoming a leading building contractor and the largest employer of labour in the world.

His contracts included those for the Houses of Parliament and Nelson's Column.

He was an MP and one of the guarantors for the Great Exhibition of 1851. He was knighted in 1855.

Japonica and the Nook, on The Street in Somerleyton, which have been given listed protection in 2020.

Japonica and the Nook, on The Street in Somerleyton, which have been given listed protection in 2020. - Credit: Patricia Payne/Historic England Archive

Mr Peto employed John Thomas to rebuild Somerleyton Hall (Grade II*), the parish church (Grade II*) and the picturesque estate cottages around the village green, all of which are listed at Grade II. He built the former Post Office and store and it is believed that Mr Thomas also designed the semi-detached estate workers’ cottages called Japonica and The Nook.

The former post office and store was built around 1848 to 1857 in red brick laid in Flemish bond with yellow brick dressings and a roof covering of plain red clay tiles.

It was converted into a home and bicycle hire shop in 2017. Japonica and The Nook were built in the 1850s in a Tudor vernacular style.

Where else was listed this year?

Other places to be listed for the first time this year include Brandon Railway Station, which was Grade II listed on August 28, Long Stratton War Memorial, Grade II listed on January 14 and Earlham Park in Norwich, added as Grade II on August 18.

Earlham Park in Norwich. Picture: Nick Butcher

Earlham park in Norwich. - Credit: Nick Butcher




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