Millions of bluebell blooms set to dazzle once more at Norfolk burial ground

Norfolk Bluebell Wood Burial Park

This year’s blooms are as beautiful as ever at Norfolk Bluebell Wood Burial Park. - Credit: Norfolk Bluebell Wood Burial Park

Five acres of ancient bluebelll woods will be opened to the public for three days at the end of the month.

Entry to the open days at The Norfolk Bluebell Wood Burial Park, at Hainford, near Norwich, will be free - but visitors will be invited to make a donated to the Norfolk and Waveney MIND mental health charity.

Owner Andrew Morton said: "Representatives of MIND will be available on the day to talk to visitors and explain the importance of their work, particularly in these post-Covid days.

"The work of MIND is such a good fit with what we do here, promoting the healing power of nature to both body and soul."

Caroline and Andrew Morton, owners of Norfolk Bluebell Wood Burial Park. Picture: Promote Marketing

Caroline and Andrew Morton, owners of Norfolk Bluebell Wood Burial Park. Picture: Promote Marketing - Credit: Archant

The open days, from April 30 to May 2, coincide with blooming season for the bluebells.

Mr Morton, part of a long-established Norfolk farming family, has spent the last 13 years creating a range of native habitats across the burial ground's 18 acres.

Norfolk Bluebell Wood Burial Park

Visitors are invited to visit the ancient bluebell wood at open days on April 30 and May 1 and 2. - Credit: Norfolk Bluebell Wood Burial Park

The latest addition to the park is a natural pond. Mr Morton and his wife, Caroline, hope the area of open water will become a magnet for wildlife, like other areas in the park.

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These include a 4,800-tree 'new' woodland planted by local schoolchildren eight years ago to commemorate the Queen's Diamond Jubilee, and a wildflower meadow.

Three oak trees have been planted recently as part of the Queen's Green Canopy initiative.

Norfolk Bluebell Wood Burial Park

Dappled sunlight makes for an enchanted view at Norfolk Bluebell Wood Burial Park. - Credit: Norfolk Bluebell Wood Burial Park

The Mortons have also planted 400m of hedges running between the various areas of the park.

"The park is now teeming with an extraordinary range of wildlife - animals, birds, insects and plants," Mr Morton said.

The wood has a special place in scientific history.

It was part of the Stratton Strawless Hall estate, owned by renowned naturalist Robert Marsham (1700-1797), who achieved global fame for his highly-regarded work on phenology – the study of the effects of the seasons on plants and animals.

A glade within the park is named after him.

Norfolk Bluebell Wood Burial Park

The carpet of flowers that gives Norfolk Bluebell Wood Burial Park its name. - Credit: Norfolk Bluebell Wood Burial Park

The park will be open from 10am-4pm on each of the three open days. Mown grass and level woodland pathways around the complex are wheelchair accessible and a mobility buggy is available on site.

Dogs are welcome on leads, provided that owners clear up any mess their pets leave.

For more information visit www.norfolkbluebellwood.co.uk