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Coronavirus: Nine things that may never be the same again

PUBLISHED: 17:11 04 April 2020 | UPDATED: 13:28 05 April 2020

British Airways aircraft parked up at Norwich Airport. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

British Airways aircraft parked up at Norwich Airport. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Copyright: Archant 2020

Lockdown restrictions have been tough for many. But after a decade of austerity and four years of a nation tourn in half by Brexit, coronavirus has reignited a sense of community in Britain.

We do not know when life will go back to ‘normal’ but as neighbourliness, nature and air quality resurges, Britons might decide they do not entirely want it to.

Here are some of the changes the Covid-19 pandemic might bring.

1. Travel

The lockdown has left the travel industry in a parlous state with thousands of planes grounded, trains and coaches suspending routes and a rapid drop in use of bus and local train travel.

A train on the Lowestoft to Norwich line. Photo: Greater AngliaA train on the Lowestoft to Norwich line. Photo: Greater Anglia

It has also revealed the extent to which technology has made a lot of business travel obsolete.

AA President Edmund King told the BBC: “I think use of roads and rail and indeed bus will be reduced after this crisis.”

2. Work

Many people lucky enough to have desk-based jobs have reported the transition from office-based to home-based working to be relatively straight forward.

A woman using a laptop on a dining room table set up as a remote office to work from home.  Picture: Joe Giddens/PA WireA woman using a laptop on a dining room table set up as a remote office to work from home. Picture: Joe Giddens/PA Wire

With the proliferation of conference apps like Zoom and Skype, video conferencing and remote working is a lot more reliable than it once was, and could potentially open up the workplace to people previously shut out.

The average Briton’s commute is around 58 minutes a day and post-shut down many will be sad to relinquish the extra few minutes in bed or a little more family time to be in the office for 9am.

More people are likely to ask to work from home one to two days per week, easing pressure on the transport system and reducing stress among the workforce.

3. Broadband

Broadband connection is key when working from home. Picture: Getty Images/iStockphotoBroadband connection is key when working from home. Picture: Getty Images/iStockphoto

Speedy internet has been a godsend for everyone stuck indoors.

But internet black spots are still common in rural areas, with the situation so bad that Rishi Sunak pledged to pump £5 billion into the rollout of full-fibre broadband in the latest budget in a bid to “level up” the UK.

Councillor Mark Hawthorne, digital connectivity spokesman for the Local Government Association (LGA), said: “We have long-called for funding and support to bridge the digital connectivity gap.”

He added: “The LGA has previously called for a ‘social tariff’ to ensure a basic service is available at an affordable price to those most in need.”

The limit for contactless card payments will rise to £45 to curb coronavirus. Picture: Getty Images/iStockphotoThe limit for contactless card payments will rise to £45 to curb coronavirus. Picture: Getty Images/iStockphoto

4. Demise of cash

Cash is no longer king in this age of infection as people contemplate just how many hands their notes have passed through.

Last month, the contactless limit was raised from £30 to £45 to allow shoppers to make larger purchases without having to punch their pin into a potentially dirty keypad.

While this is convenient for internet-enabled age groups, it can spell difficulties for the elderly and those in the gig economy as banks shut their doors and ATMs are removed.

People observe social distancing while queuing at Waitrose supermarket. Picture: Morgan Harlow/PA WirePeople observe social distancing while queuing at Waitrose supermarket. Picture: Morgan Harlow/PA Wire

Gareth Shaw, head of money for consumer advice group Which? warned that the move towards cashless, while well-intentioned, could hurt vulnerable groups - particularly if initiatives like mobile bank branches are permanently withdrawn.

5. Local shops

Independent grocery shops have experienced an unexpected renaissance during the Covid-19 crisis in an otherwise bleak outlook for the high street.

While images of empty shelves and tales of month-long waiting lists for deliveries from major supermarket chains have taken over social media, most corner shops have kept calm and well stocked.

The children of key workers that attend Mattishall Primary School made this banner to send well wishes and thanks to the community. Picture: Mattishall Primary SchoolThe children of key workers that attend Mattishall Primary School made this banner to send well wishes and thanks to the community. Picture: Mattishall Primary School

6. Waste

Now trips outside are strictly limited, many households are thinking of ways to make their shopping go that little bit further.

There has been a proliferation of articles on how to reduce waste and save cash in uncertain times, with Great British Bake Off star Nadia Hussain even teaching the frugal nation how to cook up banana skins.

There is also the issue of what overflowing bins mean for our health as councils cut back on collection and recycling services.

Ben and Isaac Rickett follow P.E with Joe, a fitness workout by Joe Wicks that is aimed at children that are being home schooled due to Covid-19. Picture: Martin Rickett/PA WireBen and Isaac Rickett follow P.E with Joe, a fitness workout by Joe Wicks that is aimed at children that are being home schooled due to Covid-19. Picture: Martin Rickett/PA Wire

7. Community

After years of political arguments and division, all of a sudden we are a nation dreaming up ways to help our communities.

From clapping the NHS, hundreds of thousands of people signing up as crisis volunteers or just getting to know your neighbours, the past few weeks have been full of stories of solidarity.

We could be in for a year of periods of greater and lesser social isolation as we wait for a vaccine to be developed and while it will be tough, this time of crisis is bringing us all together.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson clapping outside 11 Downing Street in London to salute local heroes during Thursday's nationwide Clap for Carers NHS initiative to applaud NHS workers fighting the coronavirus pandemic Picture: Pippa Fowles/Crown Copyright/10 Downing Street/PA WirePrime Minister Boris Johnson clapping outside 11 Downing Street in London to salute local heroes during Thursday's nationwide Clap for Carers NHS initiative to applaud NHS workers fighting the coronavirus pandemic Picture: Pippa Fowles/Crown Copyright/10 Downing Street/PA Wire

8. Childcare

Parents have found they are not only breadwinners, but also teachers and live-in entertainers for their children, placing a huge amount of stress on an already difficult situation.

Headteacher’s accross Norfolk have advised parents not to put too much pressure on themselves.

9. Government intervention

In the last few weeks the Government has pledged hundreds of billions of pounds to prevent the collapse of the economy - offering increased support to employees, self-employed and unemployed alike.

It has left some scratching their heads as to why it took a global pandemic for the Government to decide it is capable of spending its way out of some of our most pressing problems.

Dr Doug Parr, chief scientist for Greenpeace UK, said: “How we react in times of crisis, including the climate emergency, is an entirely political choice and the only thing standing in the way is how our government chooses to respond.

“We will get through the current crisis, and once that happens we can push the government to protect our planet and put the economy onto a safer and more sustainable footing - because we all know they have it in their power to do so.”

• For more updates on coronavirus join the Norfolk Coronavirus Facebook group.


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