Moving tale of rescued World Horse Welfare pony Clippy inspires winning garden at RHS Chelsea Flower Show

World Horse Welfare chief executive Roly Owers, left, with Hugh Bonneville in the World Horse Welfar

World Horse Welfare chief executive Roly Owers, left, with Hugh Bonneville in the World Horse Welfare Garden at RHS Chelsea 2017. Picture: BASIL HAYES - Credit: Archant

A garden based on the moving tale of rescued pony has galloped to gold-medal glory at this year's RHS Chelsea Flower Show.

Sculpture by Tom Hill in the World Horse Welfare Garden at RHS Chelsea 2017. Picture: BASIL HAYES

Sculpture by Tom Hill in the World Horse Welfare Garden at RHS Chelsea 2017. Picture: BASIL HAYES - Credit: Archant

Snetterton-based charity World Horse Welfare worked with garden designers Adam Woolcott and Jonathan Smith to create the green space, replete with a tumbledown stable, wildflowers, poisonous plants and a horse sculpture made out of horseshoes - created by Tom Hill - for the world-famous event.

The garden tells the story of Clippy, a dapple grey pony who was rescued from terrible conditions by the charity and restored to health.

The garden won a people's choice award gold medal in an 'artisan garden' category at the show, which finished today (Saturday, May 27).

Roly Owers, World Horse Welfare's chief executive, said: 'We are tickled pink to have been awarded this medal, not least because it reflects all the hard work put in by our superb designers and their team.

The World Horse Welfare Garden at RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2017. Picture: BASIL HAYES

The World Horse Welfare Garden at RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2017. Picture: BASIL HAYES - Credit: Archant

'Our garden gives us such a brilliant platform to tell a story that so well reflects the thousands of horses who desperately need our help today.'

Mr Owers said the garden, which was funded by a private donor, aimed to shine a light on 'invisible' horses around the world whose suffering goes unnoticed.

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He said: 'We are here to highlight the importance of our work to existing and new supporters, to bring World Horse Welfare's approach to life and to inspire visitors to recognise the welfare challenges facing so many horses around the world.

'In Britain alone there are over 3,400 horses are at risk - sadly World Horse Welfare has much work to do both internationally and on our doorstep.'

The World Horse Welfare Garden at RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2017. Picture: BASIL HAYES

The World Horse Welfare Garden at RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2017. Picture: BASIL HAYES - Credit: Archant

Mr Smith said it had been an honour to design the garden.

He said: 'We absolutely love working with British wildflowers and we don't often have the chance to use poisonous ones in our garden so we've had great fun designing the area representing Clippy's terrible living conditions.

'We've juxtaposed that with an area representing his new pasture showcasing horse herbs and beneficial plants.'

World Horse Welfare is celebrating its 90th anniversary this year.

World Horse Welfare's Clippy meets Kirstie Allsopp at RHS Chelsea 2017. Picture: BASIL HAYES

World Horse Welfare's Clippy meets Kirstie Allsopp at RHS Chelsea 2017. Picture: BASIL HAYES - Credit: Archant

World Horse Welfare's Clippy at RHS Chelsea 2017. Picture: BASIL HAYES

World Horse Welfare's Clippy at RHS Chelsea 2017. Picture: BASIL HAYES - Credit: Archant

World Horse Welfare's Grace Vooght and Roly Owers with Clippy in the World Horse Welfare Garden at R

World Horse Welfare's Grace Vooght and Roly Owers with Clippy in the World Horse Welfare Garden at RHS Chelsea 2017. Picture: BASIL HAYES - Credit: Archant

Garden designers Jonathan Smith, left, and Adam Woolcott with the gold medal in the World Horse Welf

Garden designers Jonathan Smith, left, and Adam Woolcott with the gold medal in the World Horse Welfare Garden at RHS Chelsea 2017. Picture: BASIL HAYES - Credit: Archant

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