‘Meeting him really gave me a chance at happiness, life and a relationship’ - girlfriend of Norwich McDonald’s attack victim Richard Moore remembers him 10 years on

McDonalds murder victim Richard Moore with his partner Jemma Todd.

McDonalds murder victim Richard Moore with his partner Jemma Todd.

A woman who lost the father of her unborn child in a one-punch attack has spoken out 10 years to the day, to warn that violence is not the answer.

submitted pic
Jemma Todd with boyfriend Richard Moore who was killed in McDonalds in norwich in M

submitted pic Jemma Todd with boyfriend Richard Moore who was killed in McDonalds in norwich in March 2007

Jemma Moore was eight months pregnant when her and her boyfriend Richard Moore went for an evening meal at McDonald's in Haymarket, Norwich.

But 28-year-old Miss Moore - who changed her name in tribute eight years ago - noticed a man staring at her.

She asked him to stop, but an argument started between the couple, and the two men who were sitting nearby.

It then all kicked off, with the men attacking 21-year-old Mr Moore, as terrified diners looked on.

Jemma Todd, whose partner Richard Moore died at MacDonald's in Norwich, with their five-day-old baby

Jemma Todd, whose partner Richard Moore died at MacDonald's in Norwich, with their five-day-old baby, Cameron Richard John Moore. Cameron is wearing one of the Norwich City bibs his father had bought before he died. Photo: Denise Bradley Copy: Dominic Chessum For: EN Archant Norfolk pics © 2007 (01603) 772434 - Credit: Archant © 2007


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'It just all happened so quickly,' Miss Moore said. 'That someone would then become violent is unnecessary, it should have stayed verbal and it had no reason to turn to violence.'

Mr Moore suffered more than 20 injuries, but it was one blow which tore an artery in his neck and killed him.

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'He was standing up for me but there's no way he would have expected it to turn into violence.'

Miss Moore said the decade which has passed since that tragic day had been heartbreaking, especially raising her son, Cameron, who Mr Moore had been 'so excited' to welcome.

Cameron Moore, whose father Richard Moore was killed in an attack in McDonald's, Haymarket, Norwich,

Cameron Moore, whose father Richard Moore was killed in an attack in McDonald's, Haymarket, Norwich, in 2007. Photo: Jemma Moore - Credit: Jemma Moore

'I know we were young but he was a planned baby,' Miss Moore, who still lives in Norwich, said. 'But now my son hasn't got a dad, and I'm left without the man I wanted to spend my life with.

'People don't realise how quickly it can change everyone's lives. It just takes one of those punches to kill, just one.'

The young couple met when Miss Moore's brother, James, worked at Burger King with Mr Moore, who he described as his 'brother and best friend'.

Miss Moore said he gave her his number, and soon they were inseparable, enjoying walks by the river during their three-year relationship.

Funeral of Richard Moore at St Catherine's Church, Aylsham Road
He died at McDonalds on the Haymark

Funeral of Richard Moore at St Catherine's Church, Aylsham Road He died at McDonalds on the Haymarket in the city centre as a result of a fight. Picture: James Bass Copy: Dominic Chessum For: EN Archant Photographic / EN © 2007 Tel: (01603) 772434 - Credit: Evening News © 2007

'I came out of care and meeting him really gave me a chance at happiness, life and a relationship. We had a lot of love for each other.

'We supported each other and planned our life together.'

She said when she was pregnant, she suffered badly with morning sickness, but that Mr Moore was always there rubbing her back.

Since his death, she's suffered with PTSD, and still had nightmares and flashbacks.

'Some days I can't even go to the supermarket. I'm still in a state of shock, although therapy has helped,' she said.

'We should have had a lot longer together. We would be married by now.'

But even though the pain was still raw, Miss Moore said she had always been up front about what had happened with Cameron, who will turn 10 exactly a month to the day his father died.

'I tell Cameron he was lovely, a gentleman who would do anything for anyone.

'He's the spitting image and he's so much like him. I never felt the need to hide it from him, I would rather face it alongside him.

'I plan to make the most of it with Cameron and give him and my daughter the things we had planned for the future.'

But she now wanted to spread a message of awareness.

'I don't think people realise how precious life is and how quickly one punch can change everything,' she said.

'Even the people who done it, they didn't go out with that motive that day.

'My life changed dramatically, I struggled with a drinking problem after I gave birth to Cameron, I could not live in our home because I couldn't face going back.'

She added some had said she was to blame, for telling the man to stop looking at her.

But she said: 'People need to think before they act with their fists, people can blame me all they want but you do not need violence.'

After the attack, Mr Moore was rushed to the Norfolk and Norwich Hospital with head injuries, and he died the next day.

He had been a pupil at the Hewitt School from 1998 to 2002.

He was a keen Norwich City supporter, and had hoped he could take Cameron to matches - one of the first photos of Miss Moore and Cameron together sees him wearing a bib bought by his father which read: 'I dribble for Norwich City.'

Father and son Gerard and Jonathon Stonehouse were convicted of his manslaughter in 2007, after both denied the charge and said they had acted in self defence. Gerard Stonehouse was jailed for nine years but was released early on compassionate grounds and died in April 2012.

Jonathon Stonehouse was released in 2012 after serving half his sentence but was sent back behind bars that same year after breaching his license and visiting a city nightclub.

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