Meet Norfolk’s Ark-Wright: Ron celebrates a career of 70 years at traditional ironmonger Blyth and Wright in Sheringham

Ron Wright from Blyth & Wright Ironmongers, Sheringham.PHOTO: ANTONY KELLY

Ron Wright from Blyth & Wright Ironmongers, Sheringham.PHOTO: ANTONY KELLY - Credit: Archant

When Ron Wright began work in Sheringham family business Blyth and Wright in 1944, he was 13 years old and fresh out of school.

Ron Wright from Blyth & Wright Ironmongers, Sheringham. Pictured with his son, Chris.PHOTO: ANTONY K

Ron Wright from Blyth & Wright Ironmongers, Sheringham. Pictured with his son, Chris.PHOTO: ANTONY KELLY - Credit: Archant

Back then it was half-a-crown for a bag of kindling and his father's shop was one of three ironmongers in the seaside town.

Blyth & Wright Ironmongers, Sheringham.PHOTO: ANTONY KELLY

Blyth & Wright Ironmongers, Sheringham.PHOTO: ANTONY KELLY - Credit: Archant

After steadily expanded the business to stretch out along the high street, 70 years on Mr Wright still puts on his shop coat each day to come to work.

Ron Wright from Blyth & Wright Ironmongers, Sheringham. Ron's father, pictured.PHOTO: ANTONY KELLY

Ron Wright from Blyth & Wright Ironmongers, Sheringham. Ron's father, pictured.PHOTO: ANTONY KELLY - Credit: Archant

And though times have changed – the shop now employs a staff of 16 and sells everything from kitchen goods to garden furniture and fine china – customers can still walk in and buy a single screw for five pence.

Mr Wright, now 83, said the business had been his labour of love carefully crafted over the years into the busy shop it is today, now managed under the watchful eye of son Chris, 47.


You may also want to watch:


He said: 'I lost my mother when I was six and my step-mother kept me fed, clothed and clean but not a lot else.

'Because of the circumstances at home this became home to me.'

Most Read

A bout of rheumatic fever kept Mr Wright off school for a year when he was 12, and rather than go back until leaving age at 14, he went into the family business.

Back then it was a single shop front, but over the years Mr Wright bought adjoining shops that came up for sale, developing the business into the hive of rows and rooms stocking thousands of products it is today.

He said: 'I used to be very awkward to make sure I got my way.

'As the houses next door came up for sale I got hold of them. I had already made the decision.'

The eclectic plot of land also includes a six-bedroom Victorian townhouse at the back of the site, now used for storage space and providing a right-of-way through to the high street.

But despite the shop's change in size and range, Mr Wright has fought hard to keep much of its traditional charm, a washing mangle can be spotted tucked in between the wood-burning stoves and a collection of ancient screws from before his time still sit on a shelf.

Mr Wright, who lives in Sheringham with wife Bridget, 77, went on to have three sons, Chris, Andy and Jamie.

Jamie died from a rare blood disorder in 2012, 10 years after middle brother Andy died at the age of 34 from a brain aneurism.

Chris, who is the third generation of Wrights to work in the shop, said he had thrown himself into the business to cope with the loss of his two brothers.

He lives in Beeston Regis with his wife Kristi, 39, and nine-year-old daughter Freya, said: 'It is sad now that it is just the old man and myself.'

Do you have a story to tell? Email sabah.meddings@archant.co.uk

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus