McDonald's jury set to retire

The jury in the McDonald's manslaughter trial will retire tomorrow to consider its verdict after hearing there was an “element of incredible bad luck” in Richard Moore's death.

The jury in the McDonald's manslaughter trial will retire tomorrow to consider its verdict after hearing there was an “element of incredible bad luck” in Richard Moore's death.

In closing speeches at Norwich Crown Court, prosecutor John Farmer said that the jury must decide whether the two defendants got up to give “puny” Mr Moore a “good hiding”.

He added: “Richard Moore was not a man-mountain and you must decide whether Jonathan Stonehouse, who is at least 25 per cent heavier, was so fearful that he had to act in self-defence.

“With Gerard Stonehouse you must look at the pictures and decide if this is a man telling his son to calm down or is he about to deliver a kick as though he was kicking a football.”

However, Jonathan Mitchell, defending Gerard Stonehouse, said the jury must decide whether the men were acting in a “joint venture” and whether his client was involved before or at the moment at which the fatal blow was struck.

Jonathan Goodman, defending Jonathan Stonehouse, said: “The issue is very simple: when he threw his first punch was Jonathan Stonehouse acting unlawfully. If you decide he was acting in self-defence or that he might have been, then he is not guilty of manslaughter.”

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Mr Moore, 21, died in the Hay Hill, Norwich, branch of McDonalds in March this year. A fight had started after an argument over his girlfriend Jemma Todd.

Gerard, 48, and Jonathan Stonehouse, 18, both of Woodcock Road, Norwich, deny manslaughter. The case continues.

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