Lydia Eva to leave Lowestoft for her Great Yarmouth home

The Lydia Eva moored at South Quay, Great Yarmouth.Photo: Andy DarnellCopy: Anthony CarrollFor: EDPA

The Lydia Eva moored at South Quay, Great Yarmouth.Photo: Andy DarnellCopy: Anthony CarrollFor: EDPArchant © 2009 (01603) 772434 - Credit: Archant © 2009

The last surviving steam drifter in Britain will be leaving Lowestoft on Sunday as she makes her way to her home in Great Yarmouth.

The Lydia Eva will be leaving Lowestoft harbour, where she winters, at about 3pm and is she is due to arrive in Yarmouth's South Quay at her usual moorings at 7pm.

She was built in 1930 in 1930 for Gorleston fisherman Harry Eastick and named after his daughter. During that era, more than 1,000 fishing boats thronged the ports of Great Yarmouth and Lowestoft as the herring fishing industry boomed.

Her fish hold on one day in 1937 held a season's record catch of 220,000 herring.

After a £1.2m restoration by the Lydia Eva and Mincarlo Trust, she has been turned in to a floating museum, which is free to visitors.


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