Lowestoft teenager's school report shock

A mother last night voiced her astonishment after receiving a letter and report relating to her son's performance at school - despite his never attending a lesson there.

A mother last night voiced her astonishment after receiving a letter and report relating to her son's performance at school - despite his never attending a lesson there.

Sue Willgoss was mystified when she received a letter from the Denes High School, Lowestoft, informing her that her son, who has Asperger's syndrome, did well in his mock SAT exams.

This followed a previous report which revealed he had a 100pc attendance record and contained grades for his performance in two subjects, art and design, and geography.

The 14-year-old boy was enrolled at the Denes, in Yarmouth Road, but has not attended classes because of his condition, which is a form of autism, and he is taught at home.

Mrs Willgoss, of Oulton, near Lowestoft, said she was mystified how teaching staff could pass comment on her son's progress when he had never attended lessons, and has demanded answers.

In response, school head Mick Lincoln has apologised to the family for the performance reports, but insisted Mrs Willgoss's son was given a 100pc attendance level because he is still in receipt of out-of-school provision and needed to be marked as present for educational welfare purposes.

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Mrs Willgoss, 44, a learning support assistant, said: "I think it is outrageous that this has happened. It has astounded me that anything like this can come out of a school. I am just standing up for parents' rights.

"This just shows how teachers could be writing reports, but not even thinking of your child. They must have been thinking of somebody when they made these comments. It really has been bizarre."

Mrs Willgoss, who asked for her son not to be named, said his year nine progress review was issued in November last year. This was followed up by a letter in February, referring to the boy's good performance in his mock SAT exams.

Mrs Willgoss, who has three other children, two of whom also have special educational needs, added she was also unhappy about her son being marked down on the register as being present at school.

Mr Lincoln said the boy's target grades were automatic-ally generated from his performances at previous schools, but admitted that the addition of performance grades from Denes' staff was down to human error.

He explained that the letter referring to the mock exam was widely produced for the majority of students who had performed well and the one addressed to Mrs Willgoss had been wrongly sent out.

He added that a new registration system had been set up where students such as Mrs Willgoss's son would be marked down as being in "dummy" tutor groups so their attendance was recorded without appearing that they had been at school.

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