Local station will toast pirate radio glory days with special broadcast

The Mincarlo Trawler, the last surviving fishing vessel built in Lowestoft. Photo: Mick Howes

The Mincarlo Trawler, the last surviving fishing vessel built in Lowestoft. Photo: Mick Howes - Credit: Archant

East Point Radio will commemorate 50 years since the government crackdown on pirate radio stations by broadcasting from the decks of the Mincarlo Trawler.

East Point Radio, formerly Southwold and Lowestoft Community Radio, launched in 2016. Photo: Courte

East Point Radio, formerly Southwold and Lowestoft Community Radio, launched in 2016. Photo: Courtesy of Lily Tarbox - Credit: Archant

Pirate radio first gained mass popularity in the early 1960s, when unlicensed stations began broadcasting pop music from offshore vessels.

They played the kind of pop and rock that was not permitted on mainstream radio, before the government's 1967 Marine Broadcasting Offences Act prohibited the existence of offshore stations.

But the eradication of pirate radio was unsuccessful and many illegal broadcasters simply came ashore and set up their own transmitters.

The station is commemorating 50 years since the government crackdown on pirate radio. Photo: Courtes

The station is commemorating 50 years since the government crackdown on pirate radio. Photo: Courtesy of Lily Tarbox - Credit: Archant

Although there are nowhere near as many stations today as there once were, pirate radio remains incredibly popular.


You may also want to watch:


And from today until Monday, August 14, Lowestoft and Southwold's East Point Radio will celebrate the glory days of pirate radio with live broadcasts from the last surviving fishing vessel built in Lowestoft.

Lily Tarbox, who is one of the presenters on East Point Radio, explained the significance of the event.

A selection of the East Point Radio presenters. Courtesy of Lily Tarbox

A selection of the East Point Radio presenters. Courtesy of Lily Tarbox - Credit: Archant

Most Read

'We've decided to collaborate with the Mincarlo and invite local people on board to see a community radio station in action,' she said.

'The banning of pirate radio in 1967 was a big event because we didn't want to listen to what was being played on mainstream radio – we wanted to listen to pop music!'

Across the four days, 16 different presenters will be playing the very best in 1960s classics.

The schedule includes Bill and Sylvie Jagger, who originally took to the airwaves on Blyth Valley Community Radio in 2009, before founding East Point Radio (formerly Southwold and Lowestoft Community Radio) in 2016.

'Calling ourselves 'East Point' conveys to people that we're broadcasting from the east of England,' added Mrs Tarbox.

'We broadcast to the local area, East Anglia and, because we're also online, we can be heard all over the world.'

'A big selection of music is played on our station and this commemoration event is a great opportunity for people to see and hear what we do.'

East Point Radio will be broadcasting from 11am to 4pm on the Mincarlo every day until August 14.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter