How camera footage helped catch jailed rogue trader fly-tipper

Fly-tipping

Paul McNulty dumped thatch from a roof on farmland. - Credit: Broadland and South Norfolk Councils

It was on a summer morning that the discovery of dumped roof thatch in a Norfolk field triggered a chain of events which means rogue trader fly-tipper Paul McNulty is now behind bars.

McNulty was caught on camera at a farm in Horstead dumping concrete, plasterboard, waste timber and roof sheeting among other items.

On Tuesday afternoon McNulty, 45, was jailed for 16 weeks at Great Yarmouth Magistrates' Court after he had pleaded guilty to four counts each of being an unregistered carrier of controlled waste and depositing controlled waste.

The initial complaint came through to officers in Broadland and South Norfolk Council's environmental health department that material had been dumped at a farm in Horstead.

Ali Pridmore

Ali Pridmore, senior community protection officer at Broadland and South Norfolk councils. - Credit: Dan Grimmer

Ali Pridmore, senior community protection officer at the councils, went to investigate and found piles of thatched roofing which had been dumped in a field.

He also found material clearly from a refurbishment of a building, including plasterboard, timber and rubble - and among that rubbish was evidence linking it to the Union Buildings in Norwich.

Fly-tipping

The waste which was flytipped by Paul McNulty. - Credit: Broadland and South Norfolk Councils

And a sequence of stills from cameras at the farm caught 45-year-old McNulty, of Devonshire Street un Norwich, using a tipper vehicle to dump the waste, in the act.

Fly-tipping

Paul McNulty fly-tipped waste on farmland at Horstead. - Credit: Broadland and South Norfolk Councils

Fly-tipping

Paul McNulty dumped waste on land at Horstead. - Credit: Broadland and South Norfolk Councils

Fly-tipping

Paul McNulty did not have a licence to collect or dispose of waste. - Credit: Broadland and South Norfolk Councils

Fly-tipping

Paul McNulty captured on camera flytipping at Horstead - Credit: Broadland and South Norfolk Councils

Fly-tipping

The vehicle Paul McNulty used was seized during the investigation into his flytipping. - Credit: Broadland and South Norfolk Councils

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Investigations at the Union Buildings, in Rose Lane, established McNulty had been paid to take away material during refurbishment.

He had duped the person who paid him into believing he was licenced to collect and dispose of waste.

He had no such licence - he was a rogue trader who simply dumped the rubbish where opportunity knocked.

Fly-tipping

Waste which was flytipped by Paul McNulty. - Credit: Broadland and South Norfolk Council

Meanwhile, there were more reports of fly-tipping at farms in Great Melton - with the vehicle's description matching the one used at Horstead.

Crucially, the still photographs taken at Horstead captured a licence plate, which allowed environment health officers to trace the vehicle to McNulty at his home near Norwich.

Mr Pridmore said it was a rarity for somebody to go to prison for fly-tipping.

But he said: "It sends a clear message to those who carry waste without authority and dispose of waste unlawfully that there are serious consequences, including the deprivation of their liberty."

Mr Pridmore said such sentences were also of benefit to the legitimate companies which dispose of waste - who do pay for licences and keep correct records - because rogue traders often undercut them.

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