The Norwich neighbourhoods where the richest and the poorest live side-by-side

Figures released by the Ministry of Housing and Communities and Local Government show the most and l

Figures released by the Ministry of Housing and Communities and Local Government show the most and least deprived areas in Norwich. Picture: Archant - Credit: Archant

Some of the poorest and richest areas of Norwich are divided by just one street, according to the latest official figures on deprivation.

A map of deprivation, from the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government, shows the stark divide between the haves and have-nots in the city. The three areas where the divide is most stark is the Golden Triangle, Harvey Lane and the Bluebell Road area.

-Unthank Road

Located in one of the most sought-after neighbourhoods in the city, Clarendon Road fits every stereotype of the Golden Triangle.

Unthank Road in Norwich - the darker the colour, the higher the level of deprivation. Picture: Flour

Unthank Road in Norwich - the darker the colour, the higher the level of deprivation. Picture: Flourish/Archant - Credit: Flourish/Archant


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Rows of 19th century chimney-stacked terraced houses line the streets, offset by the adjacent three-storey buildings with neat hedges and arched doorways.

But looking ahead from the street towards Unthank Road a high-rise tower block looms across the skyline.

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Figures show the estate surrounding Winchester Tower in Vauxhall Street - which includes Oxford Street, Suffolk Square, Trory Street and Rupert Street - is the fifth most deprived area of Norwich and in among the 10pc most deprived neighbourhoods in the country.

It is just a two-minute walk away from Clarendon Road, which is ranked within the 20pc least deprived neighbourhoods in England.

The four storey Georgian properties of Clarendon Road in Norwich are just a stone's throw away from

The four storey Georgian properties of Clarendon Road in Norwich are just a stone's throw away from the Vauxhall Street tower block. Picture: Neil Didsbury - Credit: Archant

Oliver Logan, 80, and his wife Mary, 84, have lived in Clarendon Road for 50 years.

"It used to be fairly working class but it has poshed up a bit," said Mr Logan.

Mrs Logan added: "I see deprivation in the Vauxhall Centre area but it's a nice community centre."

The statistics, released last week, combine levels of income, unemployment, education, health, crime, barriers to housing and the quality of the local environment.

Mary and Oliver Logan live in the more affluent area of the Golden Triangle in Norwich. Picture: Nei

Mary and Oliver Logan live in the more affluent area of the Golden Triangle in Norwich. Picture: Neil Didsbury - Credit: Archant

They are then used to score each neighbourhood on a deprivation scale between one and 10 - officially known as the Index of Multiple Deprivation. Those scoring one are among the 10pc most deprived neighbourhoods in England and those with a score of 10 are the 10pc least deprived.

Mr and Mrs Logan's neighbourhood scored 10 for employment, education and housing and eight for income.

In contrast, the Vauxhall Street area scored one for income, employment and health, while education, housing and crime scored two.

Naomi Wood, 36, has lived at Oxford Street for more than two years. Her terraced home directly faces the high-rise flats in the Somerleyton Gardens housing estate.

Oxford Street is one of the most deprived neighbourhoods in Norwich. Picture: Kate Wolstenholme.

Oxford Street is one of the most deprived neighbourhoods in Norwich. Picture: Kate Wolstenholme. - Credit: Archant

She said there was a good community in the area, where children from mixed backgrounds all attended Bignold Primary School in Wessex Street.

But she said there was a drug problem. "I have found needles in our front garden," she added.

-Bluebell Road

Bluebell Road in Norwich - the darker the colour, the higher the level of deprivation. Picture: Flou

Bluebell Road in Norwich - the darker the colour, the higher the level of deprivation. Picture: Flourish/Archant - Credit: Flourish/Archant

The neighbourhood surrounding the University of East Anglia, including Bluebell Road above North Park Avenue, has seen the biggest improvement in deprivation levels in Norfolk since 2015.

It is now one of the 10pc least deprived areas in the country.

Norman and Marie Collins have lived in the neighbourhood for nearly 40 years.

The neighbouring area between Northfields, The Avenues and Salter Avenue had an overall deprivation score of two out of 10, making it one of the most deprived.

Norman and Marie Collins live on Ruskin Road, one of the least deprived neighbourhoods in Norwich. P

Norman and Marie Collins live on Ruskin Road, one of the least deprived neighbourhoods in Norwich. Picture: Kate Wolstenholme. - Credit: Archant

Mrs Collins, 74, said: "We raised our first three children in a rotten maisonette in Northfields with no garden and my husband was on low income." She said their current home in Ruskin Road had been a "grotty" council house when they first moved in but said: "We've gradually done it and got it to how we like it, but we are still on basic pension."

She added: "This area has changed so much because it's largely student properties."

Maimuna Balde, 35, has lived in Northfields with her husband and two children aged three and eight for nearly two years. She said she had moved five times in the city and that Northfields was better than some of the places she had lived before.

"It's a nice and calm area", she said.

Maimuna Balde lives in Northfields, one of the most deprived neighbourhoods in Norwich. Picture: Kat

Maimuna Balde lives in Northfields, one of the most deprived neighbourhoods in Norwich. Picture: Kate Wolstenholme. - Credit: Archant

-Harvey Lane

On the more affluent side of Harvey Lane, in Thorpe St Andrew, is a bowling club in Plumstead Road, a bakery in Gordon Avenue and a veterinary surgery in St Williams Way.

The area, which falls under Broadland District Council, is among the 10pc least deprived areas in the country.

Harvey Lane in Norwich - the darker the colour, the higher the level of deprivation. Picture: Flouri

Harvey Lane in Norwich - the darker the colour, the higher the level of deprivation. Picture: Flourish/Archant - Credit: Flourish/Archant

It is a far cry from the living conditions of the neighbourhood on the west side of Harvey Lane, which is the second most deprived area in Norwich after Heigham.

The area - which includes Supple Close, Morse Road, Lion Wood Road and Pilling Park Road - had a score of one out of 10 for income, employment, education and health, while crime was scored at three, housing five and the environment six.

"Unfortunately, lots of the people here can't read or write," said Baldassarre Guidone, chairman of Pilling Park Community Centre.

"It's a tremendous disadvantage because they have to rely on other people."

Morse Road in Norwich is among the most deprived neighbourhoods in England. Picture: Neil Didsbury

Morse Road in Norwich is among the most deprived neighbourhoods in England. Picture: Neil Didsbury - Credit: Archant

Mr Guidone said that while crime was a problem in the area, the community centre worked closely with Norfolk police to help children get out of trouble.

"There's good and bad in every neighbourhood, and there are wonderful people here," he added.

MORE: 'We're living on £10 a day': What deprivation means to Norwich families

Morse Road is one of the most deprived neighbourhoods in Norwich. Picture: Kate Wolstenholme.

Morse Road is one of the most deprived neighbourhoods in Norwich. Picture: Kate Wolstenholme. - Credit: Archant

Baldassarre 'Guido' Guidone, chairman of Pilling Park Community Centre. Picture: Denise Bradley

Baldassarre 'Guido' Guidone, chairman of Pilling Park Community Centre. Picture: Denise Bradley - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2012

Naomi Wood, from Oxford Street, Norwich, said her neighbourhood had a good community. Picture: Neil

Naomi Wood, from Oxford Street, Norwich, said her neighbourhood had a good community. Picture: Neil Didsbury - Credit: Archant

Northfields in Norwich is among the most deprived neighbourhoods in England. Picture: Neil Didsbury

Northfields in Norwich is among the most deprived neighbourhoods in England. Picture: Neil Didsbury - Credit: Archant

Northfields in Norwich is among the most deprived neighbourhoods in England. Picture: Neil Didsbury

Northfields in Norwich is among the most deprived neighbourhoods in England. Picture: Neil Didsbury - Credit: Archant

Mary Logan, 84 has lived on Clarendon Road in Norwich since she was in her thirties. Picture: Neil D

Mary Logan, 84 has lived on Clarendon Road in Norwich since she was in her thirties. Picture: Neil Didsbury - Credit: Archant

The Vauxhall Street tower block in central Norwich. Picture: Neil Didsbury

The Vauxhall Street tower block in central Norwich. Picture: Neil Didsbury - Credit: Archant

The four storey Georgian properties of Clarendon Road in Norwich are just a stone's throw away from

The four storey Georgian properties of Clarendon Road in Norwich are just a stone's throw away from the Vauxhall Street tower block. Picture: Neil Didsbury - Credit: Archant

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